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I just got back into cubing for fun, not speed. There was an interesting solving method I used to like and can't remember the name of. I believe it started with solving all the corners, then solving the left and right sides by moving the unsolved edge to change to the top layer and spinning the vertical middle layer up and down for the most part. The last part was solving the edges in the vertical middle layer which I think was the only time you really needed to memorize an algorithm. Does this method have a name I could look up?

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  • $\begingroup$ AFAIK this is simply called "corners first". You can look here for some speedcubing variants, but I don't know of any resources for methods that are not for speedcubing. $\endgroup$ Apr 15 at 16:45

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This is the Ortega method:

Using Ortega as a 3x3x3 method involves first solving the corners completely, followed by insertion of the D layer edges, and 3 of the U-layer edges. The mid-layer edges are then oriented during placement of the final U-layer edge, and finally the mid-layer edges are permuted.

Incidentally, this was the first Rubik's Cube solving method I learnt. See also here.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks, it's not quite the Ortega method I was thinking of, but you get the check because your info led me to it. The parent directory of your second PDF link shows a directory with more files. Looking through it I found it here (noted as 'Adam's solution' or Cheyer). Shame the site with links in the docs (rubikscube.info) seems to be no longer good. $\endgroup$ Apr 15 at 18:56
  • $\begingroup$ I remembered the name Ortega, but the last steps in the Cheyer were the ones I was specifically looking for, holding the solved edge in lower back and using M' U2 M U2 to rotate the other three, And MUMUMUUM'UM'UM'UU to flip the front and back top edges. $\endgroup$ Apr 15 at 18:59

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