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There was this popular girl in Facebook who had many followers. One day, she posted this post in her Facebook for fun and engagement:

It's lazy facts day!

Comment one lazy fact down below!

So the lazy facts started pouring in.
There were "The sky is not always blue", "Chocolates are sweet", "I had oatmeal for breakfast", etc, etc.

Among the lazy facts was a comment that only read two hearts.

This comment was posted by a mathematician. Nobody understood it. The mathematician was bewildered. "Pulleeze! Don't you know basic math???" he kept replying to the questioning comments on his comment.

What was going on?
Why did the mathematician expect everyone to understand his comment of only two hearts?

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The mathematician commented

2 <3

Explanation:

He expected that everyone would get it, but failed to realize that Facebook will automatically render <3 as ♥, which indeed, makes it hard to interpret.

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Perhaps it could be

♥<3, which has two hearts, and can be read as "love is less than three"? If you interpret "love" as the tennis score of 0, then that can be read "0 is less than 3", which is not a particularly interesting fact.

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  • $\begingroup$ Not the answer... good guess though. $\endgroup$ – ention everyone Oct 16 at 23:00
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Inspired by @Deusovi's answer:

Reading out loud "<3 <3" (which will be converted by Facebook to "♥♥"), you get "Less than 3 is less than three". Somewhat tautological indeed...

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Inspired by earlier answers, a slight variation:

If one looks at the 'source code' maybe one finds -less than three hearts- (in the form "<3 ♥"). The "♥♥" shown by Facebook is indeed less than three hearts.

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A human heart looks like one half of the ♥ symbol. So, the ♥ is really two hearts united, not a single one.

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