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It's been a while since I've posted actively, but here is a new puzzle for the community. Good luck and I hope you enjoy it!


... .... --- .-- / - .... . -- / - .... . / .. -- .- --. . .-.-.- .-.-.- .-.-.-

enter image description here

2, 5, 1, 8, 3, 4, 1, 3, 3, 6, 1, 5, 2, 6, 1, 3, 1, 10, 1, 9, 1, 8, 3, 6, 1, 5, 1, 10, 2, 6, 1, 8

rkcynva gur cbfvgvba bs cv

Preceding

explain

Only Use...


What am I asking, and what is the answer?


Hints

Perhaps definition 1a can be of assistance. Oh, and I wonder why the <kbd> element was used here?

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2
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I'm not getting a round answer, but...

2, 5, 1, 8, 3, 4, 1, 3, 3, 6, 1, 5, 2, 6, 1, 3, 1, 10, 1, 9, 1, 8, 3, 6, 1, 5, 1, 10, 2, 6, 1, 8

seems to be an array of vectors to traverse. The first digit is either 1, 2, or 3 corresponding to x, y, z, and the second digit is the amount. Assuming $\phi$ is at (5, 3, 20), then we can get the coordinate of $\pi$ by traversing these small vectors to get (5 + 8 + 3 + 5 + 3 + 10 + 9 + 8 + 5 + 10 + 8, 3 + 5 + 6 + 6, 20 + 4 + 6 + 6) = (74, 20, 36) If we interpret the "position of pi" to mean the distance from the origin, we can use the Pythagorean's theorem to get $$ \sqrt{74^2 + 20^2 + 36^2} \approx 84.6877 $$

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Known Facts

The morse code says:

Show them the image...

The image:

(In Mandarin)
[5, 3, 20]
Phi is in the bottom-left, pi is in the upper right.

Beneath the image, the numbers are yet unsolved. Observation: there are 16 of them, and (thanks to @Darksky) the initial numbers are all either 1, 2, or 3.

Beneath the numbers, the message asks:

(ROT13) "Explain the position of pi."

Preceding, the definition of Traverse, also unsolved.

The Pythagorean Theorem, as is well known, is
a^2+b^2=c^2

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The first part of the question can be decoded using your standard QWERTY keyboard. The numbers in each < kbd > tag correspond to...

the row and column of a letter on the keyboard, starting from the top left. For example, the first one is 2, 5 so middle row, fifth in: G.

Which leads to...

Given the point Phi, explain the position of Pi (@SirDerpy)

And so...

If the Hanzi represent the point Phi... I'm not sure how to get transverse to Pi even with the Pythagorean Theorem unless we know more about the dimensions of the rectangle.

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  • $\begingroup$ What if, perhaps, the “coordinates” were in fact dimensions, and we assume that Phi is at [0,0,0]? $\endgroup$ – PerpetualJ May 3 at 19:13
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Update from new information

From @N'Katar finding what the numbers mean, as well as the comment on it we can apply the idea that I had before (but using the correct math) where if Phi is on [0,0,0] and the dimensions are [5,3,20] (also means that is where Pi is [5,3,-20]), then the distance through is Sqrt(434) - not Sqrt(436) as I had before. The distance across using Taxicab Geometry would be 5+3+20 or 28. Still not sure if that's what it means to transverse, but another step in the right direction I hope.

Partial, maybe help someone else:

Using @SirDerpy 's answer getting the numbers in Mandarin [5,3,20] and applying it to the rectangle's width, height, and length; and using the Pythagorean Theorem, the length of the lower left corner with Phi to the upper right corner with Pi is Sqrt(436). Also, looking at the sequence pair of numbers, there are pairs that are in Pi (3.1415926...)

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