66

Section One I started by researching futhark, Germanic/Teutonic, Anglo-saxon runes. I don't interpret the characters too tightly as "modern" letters. (Note: These are stylised characters, bull past the flair to "see" them.) The crosses ARE Greek as suggested by a few commentators in the article linked to in OP. I don't see how the crossbars at the tips ...


22

I wrote a program to solve all possible conditions including everything. The code is running for some days now and I have found lots of close results. According to the benchmark, it will take a couple of days to go and as a result I would have checked every single possibility and share the result with you guys. For $1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9$, I am going to update ...


21

For starters, I've rectified the data in the image by manually adjusting UV coordinates in Blender: I edited the rectified image in GIMP, first rescaling to 144x64, then adjusting colors until the resulting image data is perfectly clear (one or two errors may have crept in): Now if you look closely, every second column is just alternating black/white. ...


17

This question is not about packing tetrahedra, it is about how many tetrahedra can share a common vertex. The constraints of this question are that the side length of the tetrahedra is equal to the radius of the sphere and all tetrahedra share a common vertex at the center of the sphere. Given these constraints, all vertices are either at the center of ...


16

This is not a solution, only a potential step along the way recently proposed on the Yahoo group by void solid and extended by dankuda. I'm reposting it here in hopes that someone can take it another step forward. Take the text of K4 and split it on W's: OBKRUOXOGHULBSOLIFBB FLRVQQPRNGKSSOT TQSJQSSEKZZ ATJKLUDIA INFBNYPVTTMZFPK GDKZXTJCDIGKUHUAUEKCAR ...


8

I found this solution on the YouTube video (not my solution), and it's even closer than the closest one in the original comment: $1 + (2-(3^{(4*5/6/7))})^{(-8)} + 9 = 10958.0020579103$


7

I was notified from my Wikipedia talk page about this puzzle, and I tried to identify it, but after halfway there's more and more unrecognized characters so I stopped there. Original: The partially-reconstructed text: Edit: here's the unicode: ꦪ​ꦱ​ꦫ​ꦩ​ꦥꦸ​ꦲꦲꦶꦮꦺꦴꦥ꧀ꦠꦶꦫꦱ​ꦯ꧀ꦩꦂ꧉​​ꦮ​ꦥ​ꦫ​ꦩ​ꦪꦸ​ꦥꦶ꧉​​◌꧀ꦲꦥꦥ꧀ꦩ​ꦲ​ꦝ​ꦫ​ꦩ​ꦲ​ꦮ​ꦭꦸ​ꦥ​ꦭꦶꦁ​ꦩ​ꦮ​ꦥꦂꦪ꧀ꦱ​ꦫ꧀ꦠꦺ​ꦩ​ꦫ​ꦥꦸ​ꦥ​ꦓ​ꦲ​꧉​ ...


7

According to https://matthewkahle.wordpress.com/2010/11/05/packing-tetrahedra/ this is a open problem so there is no solution yet


6

I will say that reading this at an hour past midnight, out in a small somewhat rural area, is definitely creepy! Poor Ricky. !!! This answer is being presented as a ‘work in progress’. First, the transcriptions provided seem to be rather careless, I must say. I will here provide new versions here. Given the shorthandish nature of the letters, and the ...


6

Another way to look at it is to project the base of each tetrahedron onto the sphere. The length of each segment is $\pi/3$. By using the law of cosines, each angle is $arcsec(3)$ and the area of one of the spherical triangles is $3\ arcsec(3)-\pi$. The area of the sphere is $4\pi$. Therefore, the max number of spherical triangles we can theoretically fit ...


6

Copied entirely from http://mathpages.com/home/kmath417.htm This is not a solution; it is just a MathJAXed version of the link provided. Magic Square of Squares It's an open question whether there exists a 3x3 magic square comprised entirely of square integers. Before considering the possibility of such a square, it's worthwhile to review some basic ...


5

This appears to be Javanese script. Here's some sample text from Omniglot so you can see the similarities: The first few characters look like ga, na, ra, ma, and maybe a final _w consonant? (The "ε" shape of the ma is pretty distinctive, but the rest is much harder to identify.) The handwriting quirks make it difficult to transcribe without knowing the ...


5

The finished grid is: Rearranged, this becomes: The clues you're missing: 1A: 11A: 16A: 1D: 2D: 5D: 7D:


4

1 down: 7 down: 14 down: 16 across: New Grid:


4

Some ideas: And hint of riches new and old. Begin it where warm waters halt And take it in the canyon down, Not far, but too far to walk. Put in below the home of Brown. From there it’s no place for the meek, The end is drawing ever nigh; There’ll be no paddle up your creek, Just heavy loads and water high. If you’ve been wise and found the blaze, ...


3

There are no satisfying explanations as to why most blade inscriptions are incomprehensible. Of course, it is likely that the sword smiths who did the metal work for the inscriptions were illiterate; however, the craftsmen could not have failed so regularly and ruined so many valuable blades with illegible inscriptions. Most epigraphic scholars suggest an ...


3

I'm not sure if the answer is relevant, but could it be continued fractions ? At least, that's what the "serie" we see in this picture makes me think. EDIT : That's being said, the formula in the top right of this picture looks like the definition of $i$ : $\sqrt{-1}$


3

All letters appearing in a set of hundred can only be


2

I might suggest, from the inclusion of Oriental, Connecticut and Vermont, that Monopoly will be involved somehow. Those are three of the properties in the light blue group on the US board. Wiki article on Monopoly How that ties to the words I'm not sure, but we might need one group of monopoly properties per sentence. Each group also seems to contain at ...


2

On the black/white rows, there is 6-bit code/encoded data (the original orientation is up-side down.) Here are 'paste bins' of the data/code in various formats: ASCII: https://pastebin.com/mAF7M8pA HEXADECIMAL: https://pastebin.com/H0tSJaY1 IBM Punch-card data: https://pastebin.com/dGH8Lxam Secondly, the colored rows create a pretty decent musical ...


1

after too much time on this, that is what I found: But maybe I am just overthinking...


1

Not a full answer, but maybe it will help you get closer: Assuming these are let frequencies: the distribution is quite flat. It's surprising (to me) that a text with only 102 letters contain all letters except q and w. The Scrabble letter distribution suggests that j, y, c, x and z are quite uncommon I'm swedish words the letter w is not part of the list ...


1

Could it be:


1

I solved #1 It is


1

This link give a long and detailed account of this and related riddles: http://anomalyinfo.com/Stories/1873-unsolved-riddle-bishop-wilberforce The answer it gives is


1

I believe this question already have the answer, here is the link Rendering the number 10,958 with the string 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 $(1+2+34) \times (5 \times 6+7) \times 8+\sqrt{9}!=10958$ (or) $(12 \times 3 \times \frac{4}{5} \times 6 \times 7+8) \times 9 = 10958.4$


1

Material That May Prove Helpful On a Remarkable Application of Cotes's Theorem John F. W. Herschel Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. 1813 103, 8-26, published 1 January 1813 http://rstl.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/103/8.full.pdf May provide insight in to how Herschel wrote mathematical notations A History of Mathematical Notations: Vol. II Florian Cajori ...


1

The answer could be under that piece of tape. If one looks closely, they could see that there is ink underneath! Not only this, but the page appears to have had the writing stripped off of it, you can see in the foruth picture, bright yellow words. What is strange about these, is that in the seventh picture, one can see that d/dx aligns almost perfectly ...


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