7

It's obviously not a valid move. Many 3x3x3 speed cubes are very loose, but in my opinion the best ones are just tight enough to not allow a corner to be twisted in isolation. I don't think there are any 2x2x2 cubes that are loose enough for such a corner twist. In an official speedcubing competition, you might find that at the end of a solve a single ...


7

One thing that is EXTREMELY important is improving your look-ahead! Look-ahead is your ability to foresee future cases and therefore prepare the algorithm for those cases so you can coordinate a pauseless transition from your current algorithm to the foreseen one. THIS is what separates an above 30 from a 20 and sub 20 and even more so a teen to a sub 10. ...


5

The 3x3 and 4x4 are very different. If you had fun in trying to solve the 3x3 by yourself for years and don't want to enter speed contest then you can probably enjoy the same feeling on the 4x4 (or on the 5x5 which might be closer to the 3x3). You can try to solve other formats by yourself, it will take time so you can keep practicing on the 3x3 to improve ...


5

We know that a 3x3x3 Rubik's cube has 43 quintillion possible positions. If a person finds a method of solving a cube by himself, then (s)he is a genius in terms of spatial intelligence. This is when you know some basics about commutators and conjugates and intuitively apply them to Rubik's cube(or similar puzzles like the 15 puzzle ). Personal experience: ...


5

I found this article describing some benefits Here is the article of solving rubiks cubes. Some of theses benefits include: You can improve you memory, You can gain better concentration, You can even improve your hand-eye coordination. Here are some more articles here and here.


4

I agree with @mchoy25 that you can bring your time down much more. Things like single finger turning, properly lubricating the cube, and knowing what the back of the cube looks like without rotating the cube will improve your time much more than switching algorithms. That said, if you want to switch to more complicated methods then I'd look up F2L. Basically,...


4

In my opinion you should look up the Fridrich method for the 3x3x3. At least the first 2 layers (F2L) methodology is really nice in this method. You will see that it is very natural feeling, no algorithms are needed for this. The top layer you can solve with the beginner method then. After a short while you will be able to solve the cube in under a minute. ...


4

A pattern that I have had success with is as follows: Alternately swipe up ($\uparrow$) and left ($\leftarrow$) (or whichever two directions you choose) as quickly as you can. When you get stuck (or when you see an opportunity$^1$), swipe right ($\rightarrow$), then up ($\uparrow$) a few times$^2$, then continue with step 1. Keep this up until you get the ...


4

For small puzzles of this type, a grid is very useful. If there are three types of item, with five of each type, you can use a grid like this. Put an x in all the squares you know cannot hold, and fill the boxes you know are true. So if you are told 1 is not a, you x the upper left box. If you are told B is 2 you fill the corresponding box, then x all ...


4

Here are some tips although the number 1 improvement will always come from more practice. I'v gone through this process and my PB is now just over 16 seconds. Get a speed-cube! It doesn't really matter which one, but it will allow you to turn faster without worrying so much about the alignment. The Valk and Gan cubes are very popular. My personal favorite ...


4

Does this beat your rooks file? (25 moves) And the Queens (21.5 moves) Again Queens, same score, with an interesting idea. The Bishops (23 moves) NP pawns (35 moves) YP pawns (33.5 moves) Dark square Bishops (26.5 moves) (with constraint added that Light square Bishops can only be captured by a King) Light square Bishops (25.5 moves) (without the ...


3

This is what Glenn said on JRCuber: "I have only one Stickerless 3×3, 6 Stickered. To me there is a completely different feel you can go way faster if set up properly. As well as you don’t have to worry about nails scratching and stickers grinding. All smooth plastic. Plastic for speed solving. Stickered for big cubes. Hope that helps."


3

One such list is on the following site by Bernard Helmstetter: http://www.ai.univ-paris8.fr/~bh/cube/ The last link on that page is a list of all 1212 configurations (rotations and reflections removed), and their average solution length is 12.58 moves.


2

You need to use better methods like the fidrich method. Cross - Find a faster way to solve the cross. After you have learnt to solve the cross quicker, try doing it on the bottom to avoid cube rotations F2L - After you have practiced F2L, learn some advanced F2L techniques. Especially try to look ahead, meaning when you know what to do to create one slot, ...


2

My answer is completely subjective, but personally, I find that puzzle-solving can be summarized as "having fun while finding new solutions to problems" (i.e. solutions you don't know). If you think that you can "find" a new, more elegant, or faster solution on your own - then keep playing with the 3x3x3. If you feel you are going nowhere with the 3x3x3 or ...


2

Just to finish the solving of this puzzle (which I am sure has been done elsewhere), you can see there are some non trivial spots, even when using the accepted strategy. I've put this in bold italics so they stand out. The rest is trivially going through the rules and applying them. However, without these key steps you will get to a stand still where ...


2

Mathematically, if $A:\mathcal{R}\rightarrow\mathcal{R}$ [an algorithm on a Rubik's Cube] is congruent ($\equiv$) to $A'$ [its inverse], that means that $A(A(R))=A'(A(R))=R$ $\forall R\in\mathcal{R}$. For any cubie $P$ in a position $p$, either $P$ stays in position $p$, or it moves to some other position $q\neq p$. Let $Q$ be the cubie that was originally ...


1

I think it partly stems from the fact that most PLL's that need M moves require double flick M2 moves. The H and Z permutations are most commonly solved with H - M2 U M2 U2 M2 U M2 Z - M2 U M2 U M' U2 M2 U2 M' , both of which have lots of M2's. Although thumb M moves can work well for single slices, I think it'd be much harder to do an M2 just as fast as a ...


1

Stickerless cubes used to be banned because for a while mostly because there was the idea that you could cheat if the cube was partly turned. If one of the layers is at a 45 degree angle, then you can see both the color of the 'sticker' facing you and the 'sticker' on the other side that you wouldn't normally be able to see. Doing this 45 degree turn on a ...


1

Ignoring any intricacies of the Rubik's cube (particularly any edge parity considerations), and assuming a random scramble has a given edge piece at any of the 12 edge locations in either orientation with equal probability, the white edge pieces can be scattered around the cube in That's a very small chance, so we can just ignore any "multiple simultaneous ...


1

A possible reason they write '6 OCLL' is by considering sune and anti-sune a single algorithm, for these are mirror cases. Same for PLLs: u, a, g(a), g(b) j, n, r, all have mirror cases, and those mirror cases can be easily solved on the other side with the same algorithm, mirrored.


1

There are other methods like Petrus or Roux, but they all involve some form of block building. CFOP is the most popular method because it has a good balance of low move count and relatively small number of short and ergonomic algorithms.


1

Your best bet would be to watch some youtube videos to learn advanced F2L. You can learn F2L from here: How To Learn F2L How To Learn F2L Intuitively . The video is not only 9 minutes long. Although you probably will take much longer to get used to the idea of F2L and it will take a few weeks until you get good times with it. At first your solving time will ...


1

As someone who can solve a 3x3x3 but only after learning an iterative technique I would say that it is a worthwhile skill. I find it can be fun to impress people when I find one lying around their house. I thought about learning a 4x4x4 but for me I just think it is going a bit far to "mildly surprise" people. I get enjoyment from figuring out a puzzle and ...


1

I've been able to solve the 3x3x3 cube for probably 15 years, always using the same basic algorithm. I rarely pick it up anymore. Perhaps 3-4 years ago (maybe longer, can't remember) I decided to go for the 4x4x4. I had some trouble applying my standard technique to the new cube, so I went back and looked up speed cubing techniques for the 3x3x3. Got ...


1

This answer is more about choosing the puzzle than general strategies. Once you have the grid, a lot of reduction tactics are the same as with Sudoku. Playing around with timed versions of the Einstein puzzle like this can soon net you shortcuts for solving the grid. Granted, you get everything laid out and can start solving immediately, but our brain is ...


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