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47

Why not open with a short riddle to start with—perhaps a couplet? For example, on the ears, you could write in suitably mysterious type: Here you are at number one To start, undo what has been done


35

You could have a small part of the QR code visible on the folded origami. Just small enough that it's not immediately obvious what it is at first.


14



13

In the first row, In the second row,


11

I have As shown here: Note: the position is easily seen to be legal, as the knight can make back and forth moves while the black pieces get into position.


11

Would a physical puzzle of some sort be appropriate? I'm thinking of something like a maze, with a lot of endpoints, but missing the middle section. Each user is given a piece of card with the centre of the maze on it, but each user's card is different, and leads them to a different endpoint. The endpoint could just be a password/phrase to be communicated ...


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7

UPDATE #4: After some asking on Matplus a few weeks ago, I found that my 42 was already beaten. But I have an ego. It feels so good to have come so close! Anyhow, here’s the “new” records. Enjoy! Without Promotions-43 The 43 Mates: With Promotions-47 The 47 Mates: I always knew that three pawn promotions. I just couldn’t figure it out myself. The same ...


7

The answer to a puzzle can be reduced to either being correct or incorrect. Thus you can make almost any puzzle have two outcomes by simply giving a correct option A and an incorrect but persuasive option B. The real issue is if the puzzle can be undermined if the solver simply tests both options; essentially reverse engineering the puzzle (e.g. a typical ...


6

Many PuzzleScript games satisfy your requirements, although I'm not sure how interesting generated levels would be, and Some games include one action button in addition to the directional inputs. In a similar vein, you may want to check out other sokoban-likes including A Good Snowman Is Hard to Build, Snakebird, Pipe Push Paradise, Stephen's Sausage Roll,...


6

I believe you are: Mostly self-explanatory: One of us is there to listen. One of us is there to cook. Another, at night, is there to look. One is the leader to show the way. One does what is done by day. One is there to look into life. Another carefully cuts like a knife.


6

For both of the puzzles you link to, unless I am mistaken, the following is true: Define the "N-restricted" version of the problem to be what you get by replacing "a random positive integer" with "a random positive integer <= N" and assuming that different integers are chosen independently. Then the limit, as N tends to infinity, of the answer to the N-...


6

The answer is Moreover, First note that Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4


5

I think "error" can be an anagram indicator, but there are some caveats. Run Time Error (4) I would be fine with this. "Error" is applicable to the previous word in the same way that "news organization" might give SEWN; it's an error of the word "time", so a "time error". (The strictest of Ximenians typically don't allow nouns as anagram indicators at ...


5

The interesting thing about anagrams is how their difficulty increases rapidly with the insertion of even a single new letter. For example, a short anagram like WROC can be solved within a glance. This is because of the number of ways of ordering the letters is the factorial of the number of letters: there are $4!=4*3*2*1=24$ possibilities to order the four ...


5

As far as I know, they are called Operator Search Puzzles. You can refer to this link: https://brilliant.org/wiki/arithmetic-puzzles-operator-search/ The "24_puzzle" is an extended puzzle of this category. PS: I am new to SE, so any constructive criticism is much appreciated :)


5

The results for both puzzles are: and an incomplete one: The cipher is a variant of: But: A note for the alphabets:


5

Here is 36 (the 37 from the OP has flaws, see comments), contributions given by: Picture:


5

Simply put, a hint should give you more information than you already have. As you say, though, a hint that simply gives the solution isn't a good one, but that doesn't mean a hint can't give too much information. It just means a hint can't give you the information you want. As an example, this is what I would probably consider to be the best hint on the ...


4

Perhaps a variation of... "To understand something, sometimes we have to trace back to the first step that started it all." or "It all starts at the first fold..." this may be too obvious... Depending on how well you know the person, you are possibly the best person to put together a sentence with enough in it to convince them without telling them what ...


4

Make the origami object be a box, which seems to contain a "real" present. Other origami designers have published more ornamental boxes, which also encourage opening. Many of them have separate pieces or assemblies for a lid and a main container. Tomoko Fuse is famous for such models.


4

The issue with a cipher puzzle is generally not being "too broad", but being solvable at all. A cipher usually isn't too broad. As long as it's not a one-time pad, it probably has a single clear best decoding. The problem with ciphers is that they are intentionally made to be hard to solve. The point of most ciphers is that nobody can decode them easily. So ...


3

Called by human names, we always existed We are like sinful dwarves, or wonders that glisten. They could be: Alternatively:


3


3

Write the word "imagiro". In other words, reverse the origami.


3

On the popular British TV gameshow, "Pointless", they often have a round that has a category and then a series of the words that fit that category in anagram form (presented as English words). In this case the anagrams are of varying difficulty, but with the presence of the given category, this gives clues to the players. The way I tend to attempt them is to ...


3

The cipher is decoded by The answer to the first puzzle is: The answer to the second puzzle is:


3

I have 35, with the following: Picture: The secret to the moves here is:


3

Here are three puzzles with $3$ visual images, each being $2\times 2$ Raven matrices: This last one is a little more unique, but quite easy like the previous ones: I cannot find such a puzzle with just $2$ visual designs. I guess it is unlikely because the more objects there are in the puzzle, the more specific the pattern. Like, I might have the sequence $...


3

$p_{n+1}$ is defined as the lowest prime factor of the number $2^{p_n}+1$. Let’s try something: The question is, Sample starting points: Hmm.... Let’s use It naturally follows that


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