New answers tagged

3

I think the buns are Solutions


2

because


9

The missing shape is Reasoning: More formally:


0

I have a different idea of the second puzzle:


1

I could not find a satisfactory solution but here are some partial thoughts & guesses.


8

From what I can see... and after the recent edit...


1



1



3

The pattern is Hence, the next number is


6

I believe that entering 71 and tapping equals repeatedly should result in the number: Why? Well note firstly that in each pair of 'equivalent' numbers: Note that in the range 10-99, there are 90 numbers in all. These can be split into the following categories: See also that for the 6 'partnerless' numbers listed in the puzzle (11, 14, 42, 50, 88, 89): To ...


6

Answer to the second question:


22

Second question


2

1) Middle is like "mirror" - or "Axial symmetry" if you like. So bottom left. 2) Similar puzzle answered here. Top right seems correct one - You count numbers each squares, and 1 yellow + 2 blue and 3 purple is missing. Same for each sides - three left, three bottom and two right, so it has to "stick" to right side of box. 3) Answered here 4) Seems like <-...


2

The answer might be this: Considering that the picture can be of any scale in all diagrams i.e. : each cross (axes) may have different scales as scales or markings are not mentioned.


0

Ι say it is The reason is:


0

Answer:


1

Other possible answers [not mentioned as an option] Answer 1: My reasoning: Answer 2:


1

For this task, I would argue that it is important to ignore the black tiles. If you look at the blank space, the black will not provide pointers towards the logical conclusion (as there are no black tiles leading to the solution). There is consistency in everything except how the black tiles relate to other tiles. My reasoning is the following: How does ...


0

And the correct answer is.... Reason continue... continue...


5

Not sure why they’re called what they are yet, but A possible solution could be that Thanks to @Stiv for noticing that


15

This is a tricky one! Some of the words could fit into many categories, but I think the final categorisation yielding four groups of four is: The connection between these four categories is then: As for the title:


1

Maybe it got a little too simple with the last hint. But here goes... So... However...


1

There can be several answers to this: Assume the following format : $$ d = (a + b)\times c $$ where, $a$ is the number of lines in the left end, b is the number of lines in the right end, and c is the number of intersection points between the "middle vertical line(s) and the horizontal lines". Now, for $A: d = 28; B: d = 15; C: d = 24; D: d = 0; E: d = 32$ ...


7

I believe a Scooby Word is one which: Like so: Meanwhile the 'Not Scooby' words can all:


4

Partial answer First of all, notice that the Not Scooby Words Scooby Words


1

I don't think you can assume that there is an elegant, satisfying answer to this problem. If the people who provided the intended answer you cited are the same people who conceived the problem, there is obviously an error somewhere, possibly a mistake in the depiction of the "B" image. Unless you have reason to believe that this is a valid problem, and only ...


2

The answer is because


8

It seems that the important thing is always to In the alphanumeric code, the number part is while the letter part shows


3

There are several ways one of the pattern differs from others. One for example If you count ALL vertical and horizontal lines A = 11 B = 9 C = 12 D = 9 E = 12 From this you can argue that A is the odd one out-- the only PRIME NUMBER or the pattern should have been 12,9,12,9,12. So A is the odd one Another way is to count all ...


6

The ambiguity is not your fault, it's just the basic nature of all categorizing puzzles that provide way more object information (9 symbols per object) than categorizing information (5 bits total). There are only 32 ways to divide the grids into categories, but because there is so much information in the objects, there are many more simple ways to describe a ...


4

I feel like some tasks are a bit ambiguous since there might be many different valid patterns. Anyways, here's my shot at it: Task 1 (I tried to find another rule) Task 2 Task 3


0

I think the answer is


1

Answer of the first puzzle should be Rule: Then


0

"D" right ?? The solution is in picture given below


3

A transition word™ is one such that For example and so on... They are called Transition words™ because


7

where By this logic T(9) is


10

I believe it is Since


10

I think the next element of the sequence is Reasoning


7



6

I think the answer is Reasoning


1

Third one Since


1

Puzzle one: Puzzle two (solved by Jeremy Dover):


18

They all


4

An IHC. word is Example: Title hint:


6

The bottom rows of the red grid are because the bottom rows of each grid are obtained by I suspect that the middle numbers are


2



6

My answer is


-1

Puzzle 35 explained with a bigger picture:


0



2

No one seems to have made any progress, so here's the partial answer for 9:


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