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The heavily-upvoted answer by user20 is actually wrong. We do not need to memorize a single thing to be able to solve all the parity problems on any arbitrary n×n×n Rubik's cube. This post is a general solution for Rubik's cube type of permutation puzzles. Its paragraph on parity is brief, because it was written for people who understand basic group theory. ...


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You should learn how to use commutators as briefly sketched in this post about general permutation puzzles. Then you would immediately know how to solve such states. In particular, it is trivial to find a sequence A to first flip one edge without affecting the top face and then make a single turn B of the top face to move the other edge into that same ...


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L' B' M' U M' U M' U M' U2 M' U M' U M' U M' B L


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Let's assume there is a sequence $A$, such that for any starting configuration $x$ there exists a number $n(x)$, such that applying $A^{n(x)}$ will solve the cube. It follows that given two configurations $x$ and $y$, we can move from $x$ to $y$ with $A^{n(X) - n(Y)}$. In other words, any sequence can be replaced by repeating A (or its reverse) for a ...


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Are you just wanting the diagrams to be clearer? TinkerCad is pretty easy to learn and free. I made these if you want to play with them: https://www.tinkercad.com/things/kOCVDD6zTu9-yamoto-pieces Then following the instructions (which your link starts at step 2): Step 2 (front view): Step 3 (left side view): Step 4 (right side view): Step 5 (right side ...


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