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Please upvote the other answers as well. ffao solved half of the ciphers on his own, and dcfyj solved the cube shortly before I did. Starting position Rotations Orange Solved by ffao Yellow White Solved by ffao Blue Green Red Solved by ffao Gray


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Well, funny story. My friend grew irritated with the dern plastic thing, so he threw it at a wall. And guess what? It fell apart. Inside, the disassembly instructions read: HOW TO DISASSEMBLE: To disassemble, throw the ball at the ground. I'm not kidding. There are two things that will cause this puzzle to break apart: the first is centripetal ...


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This puzzle is called a "Baguenaudier" which is French for "Time Waster". This solution assumes that you are holding the handle end on the left. The rings are numbered from right to left starting at 1. The solution to the puzzle involves a couple possible moves. 1) The first ring is always available to put on or take off of the bar. You take it off the ...


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After the rotation step, the gimmick is that The white face reads The red face reads The orange face reads


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The only way you can have a solve-all sequence is if you have a sequence of moves that goes through all 43 quintillion configurations of the Rubik's Cube. In order to do this, you need to draw a transition graph between all the states of the Rubik's Cube and find a Hamiltonian cycle through them. This sequence of moves doesn't necessarily have to be 43 ...


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This can be solved in 16 steps. Lets use binary here, 0 is off, 1 is on the handle You start with 11111 1 - Remove the first ring to get 01111 2 - Remove the third ring to get 01011 3 - Put back the first ring to get 11011 4 - Remove the first two rings to get 00011 5 - Remove the fifth ring to get 00010 6 - Put back the first ...


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This is mostly to help others in the process as I'm awful at decrypting ciphers. So After some poking around I figured out that and while chatting with the OP we realized that Before all of that came to light I realized that the HNQ had some valuable information for me. Which in this case was: Which gave me this list: Which tells me to: Doing all ...


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In the classic book "Winning Ways (for your mathematical plays)" by Berlekamp, Conway and Guy there is a small section devoted to wire puzzles (like the Tavern puzzles) in the second-to-last chapter. They use a technique they call a "magic mirror". Imagine a fun-house mirror that distorts your view of the puzzle. Some bits of the body of the puzzle get ...


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One other idea, partially alluded to by one of warspyking's answers:


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The key is that the four center cubules on each face of a Rubik's Revenge are indistinguishable. When you do the move sequence to swap those two edges in the "3x3x3" phase of solving a 4x4x4 cube (or to flip a single edge or swap two corners), a bunch of the center cubules get reoriented, but you don't notice because they're all the same colour and ...


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This is one of the most well-known wooden interlocking "Burr" puzzles, called The Chinese Cross. If you look at the two images below, you can see pieces that are the same shapes as yours, but with each one a different color. Using the colors as a guide, you can see how they fit together in the assembled version. The photos are from Rob Stegmann's page on ...


15

The easiest explanation would be that in a 3x3 cube, only one cube is out of position, but in a 4x4 cube two cubes are out of position. In a 15 puzzle (the sliding puzzle where you try to put the numbers in order) half of all possible initial positions are unsolvable. They call the solvable positions "even" and the unsolvable positions "odd". The "odd" ...


15

Here is a revised solution, for... ...which  (again) seems like the maximum to me.  has been verified by Molhan as being maximal.   Trivial steps have been condensed. These steps may be reversed, exchanging the roles of pegs 1 and 6, to complete moving the whole tower from peg 1 to peg 6. This approach was derived by ...


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I have the same snake cube puzzle, except that its cubes don't alternate in colour. On mine they are coloured so that the finished cube consists of 2x2x2 blocks. Drawing of the solution is under the spoiler: The 3x3x3 version of this puzzle is very common, though almost all versions use the same configuration of straight and bent cubes. You can find out ...


14

The solution to the crossword is: And this can be arranged as: My strategy: But is this solvable as a 15-puzzle? An explicit solution:


13

As answered by @BeastlyGerbil, you have the world of twisty puzzles. Here in the Twisty Puzzle Museum you can find over 5,000 of these kind of puzzles, and here is my personal collection of currently 279 puzzles (pictures are a bit outdated though, since I now have a few more shelves; list is up-to-date however). That being said, you gave the following ...


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Someone had to do it. I liked the ancient math one more though.


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You should try silicone spray aerosol, you should be able to find it in any hardware store. It seems my answer is too short, so I'll add a little poem, I hope it will please you guys. Roses are red Violets are blue Your cube is rough So what can you do? With love.


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Kevin Cruijssen gives some good examples. You might also want to consider multiple layers as a part of the puzzle, which allows you to have additional constraints, either visible or hidden. For example, "One Fish, Another Fish", where the frame and piece shapes constrain movement I highly recommend looking at Rob's Puzzle Page ( http://robspuzzlepage.com )...


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Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 Step 8 Step 9 Step 10 Step 11 Step 12 Step 13 Finally


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I think: Because: Then: Now: Since: We can conclude: But then because: We observe that: I.e.:


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Here's my attempt (maybe I'll get graphical when I have the time, text only for now.) First, label the non-dynamite barrels like this: and develop a notation: <Barrel name>-<direction> means move the named barrel to the mentioned direction, by whichever means it can move there. (It will always be unique.) Then, make the following moves: 1: D-up 2: ...


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First, what do we know about this puzzle? There are 5*7*8*11 = 3080 possible positions. Moves do not affect each other, so if you have a good set of moves, you can do them in any order. There must be at least one move of the 8 ring, but not necessarily any of the others. Given this, it is a relatively simple algorithm to find the shortest sequence of moves....


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Following Ross Millikan's suggestion, I numbered the segments of the original puzzle as follows: (Source: http://www.laserexact.nl/images/stories/virtuemart/product/gear%20maze%202x2.jpg, modified) The connections between the segments are given in the following table: One possible solution (there are several) is marked in bold. To follow it, start at 1(...


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Does an algorithm exist? Yes. Consider every valid state of the Rubik's cube. It can be brought to the solved state in 20 moves or less. For each state, apply the sequence of moves followed by its inverse. This giant algorithm is guaranteed to solve any cube. Now, does a reasonable-length algorithm exist? No. I will show that any such algorithm should ...


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There isn't, and it's been mathematically proven that there isn't. It's clear that, say, 2-dimensional assembly puzzles, and jigsaw puzzles, are simpler special cases of this three-dimensional version. But even the simple case has been proven to be NP-complete (PDF). NP-completeness is a precise technical term, but a good nontechnical approximation is "...


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The way to assemble this is in the following order : ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Picture to follow


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While the solution of the tower of Hanoi also applies to this puzzle, there is a shorter solution! For more details you can look at the Hanoi page on my website.


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