New answers tagged

14

LOGIC AS USED TO SOLVE THE PUZZLE: The first thing to note is that with 3 points for a win, 1 for a draw, and the known points totals, we must have the following end outcomes in terms of wins, draw and losses: In particular, for teams B and C either scenarios (a) would both happen together or scenarios (b) would both happen together (since we need an equal ...


2

First of all, the ticket says Now (I remark pedantically that "a" should really be "the"). Now, And Incidentally, a concert of choral ecdysiasts sounds pretty entertaining.


0

1): 2): Because "you can instantly light or shut any fire anytime if you want to" 3) 4) 5)


4

Same answer, different proof. Proof by induction on $n$. Then assume it is true for all $k: 1 \leq k \leq n-1$. Obviously: Clearly, QED


-1

Given the wording of "whose turn it is", we are left to assume that taking out the trash will be a recurring event. In this way, we can guarantee fairness regardless of $n$ and $p_i$ by simply recording who did it last and alternating each time. The coin flipping only needs to occur for the very first time, but on a sufficiently large timeline, one sample ...


8

Apologies for MS Paint quality. Numeric feature:


2

Drop the first egg from


9

A set of coins is fair in the relevant sense if and only if Proof (slightly highbrow, sorry): Alternative kinda-equivalent proof (simpler ideas but needs you to know a theorem): (Neil W suggested, in comments, taking that second approach. I'd avoided it because the other way seemed quicker and more first-principles-y, but the second way may well be easier ...


3

I believe Note that


1

Since Hehe knows his own number by watching the others, one can test the different factors that could lead to it (watched hats, with ascending sort -> possible hats Hehe could have): So we only keep some of these entries: And just consider: Hehe knows his number even before the other ones talk. This means: a-priori he knows, with no ambiguity, the number ...


0

This gives quite a simple solution:


2



2

I took a slightly different approach to Jaap Scherphuis: The two smaller numbers are factors of the largest number, and all 3 numbers are different. This means that the largest number cannot be prime - ruling out 1,2,3,5,7, and leaving us with 4, 6, 8, and 9. There are 32 possible pairs of factors of the numbers 4, 6, 8, and 9, but only 8 of these ...


7

Take text (as writing on mobile phone keyboard): as: that translates with caesar +20 (or +6 for decrypt) as:


2

The password is: Explanation:


3

What combinations of numbers are possible? From this list of possibilities, we need to find one where one person can know what their number is by seeing two of the other numbers. Here are the possible numbers a person could see others having (lowest number first), and the possible numbers that the person could be. Now we have 3 possibilities for two ...


6

It is not possible to do this in 12 steps. In fact, a simple argument shows that at least 20 steps are necessary: Tiles 1 and 8 need to be swapped. They are however a distance of 3 moves apart, so each tile needs to be moved at least 3 times. Similarly, tiles 2 and 7 also each need 3 moves to reach their goal locations. So these 4 tiles together need at ...


2


2

Below I explain all the deductions I have been seeing until I reach the solution: Possibilities: Doubts and deductions: Description: Solution and vision of each:


15

This was trickier than it looked. I have a feeling that there should be a quicker way to find the answer than the list of cases I worked through. Note: I interpret "two of which are factors of the third" to mean that two of the numbers divide the third, and that either of those two factors might be 1.


2



7

Initial notes: Detailed deduction Say the starting point is row number $n>1$, column letter $l$, and exactly one cell is omitted. The ant's journey can be described as follows: Final answer The only possible starting point is


4

With the following code let prolog search the results - X, Y, Z are the coefficients for each bag. :- use_module(library(clpfd)). list_allperms(L, Ps) :- bagof(P, permutation(L,P), Ps). f(X,Y,Z,R) :- R #= 10 * X + 11 * Y + 12 * Z. fit(X,Y,Z) :- f(X,Y,Z,R), R #< 51. fit_limit(L) :- nth0(0,L,X),nth0(1,L,Y),nth0(2,L,Z),fit(X,Y,Z). fit_unique(L,R) :- nth0(...


2

Looking at the 7x7 grid, my answer is


-1

Well, I thought it was I'm complex inside, but easy on the outside. I'm loud for one, but quiet for the others. I'm used to get hit, but there's no alternative. I die as fast, as I rise again.


2

As JNF says, your mother must have AB parents and be BB herself. Applying the final point directly to your father, before taking into account information from your own blood type your priors for his genotype are OO: $0.25$, AB: $0.25$, AA: $0.125$, AO: $0.125$, BB: $0.125$, BO: $0.125$. Thus the probabilities of a given allele from your father (again ...


1

Mom's parents have to be Meaning mother is So options for father are So it seems


0

This answer will explain in detail how we arrived at our initial simple solution. The question that you can ask the guard is: The explanation of why it works: To arrive at the given answer (question that solves the puzzle), we made the following observation:


0



0



1

I ask guard A: Then, depending on the answer: Why:


1

I originally missed the piece saying that the truthteller holds the key to freedom, so I solved the harder puzzle where that information is not known. I still like this, though. I ask guard A: Based on the answer: Full explanation:


1

Here is the question I came up with when trying to mix 1b and 2a from above: Let's break this question up a little more. ᠎ First, let us look at the case in which the person being asked is the truth-telling guard who happens to be guarding the freedom door and have the key to the freedom door: ᠎ ᠎ This makes this combination SCREECH because both ...


0

Answer for the first Puzzle - The amount of triangles that are directed up & down should be balanced. 7 stripped triangles UP - 7 stripped triangles DOWN To make the balance for the blank one you need to choose an answer D.


1

Here's a question which I think works. Explanation: (Note: I came up with this without reading the extra "warming up" section, so my question doesn't produce the exact same table that you had, but can be easily modified to do so.)


1

That is, a question is needed such that sometimes the guard cannot answer, and other times he can answer with both a yes or a no (it does not matter). So the question is about time. Meaning sometime you ask the question they may not be able to answer, while other times they can. This means you can ask the same question multiple times. The Answer is ...


0

I don't have a complete answer, but I feel like this way of looking at it makes some progress: Their answer consists of two different bits of information: whether they can answer 'yes' consistently with their truth inclination, and whether they can answer 'no'. If they can only answer one, that's the answer they give. If both are possible, they screech. ...


0

Question I'd ask: "What would the other troll tell me is the road to my destination?" Liar would tell me truth-teller would guide to death. Truth teller would tell me liar would guide me to death. I go the on the opposite road and reach my destination.


4

A brute force solution: We start with the two sixes with six empty places in between. We must fill those six places with exactly one of each number 1 to 5, as well as 7, while following the rules of spacing. Now, filling in the 3: The 4: When placing the 5, we can easily reject any solution that would leave more than 1 empty place in each suit, since we ...


2

Are you Because More specifically,


10

This works, although I'm not sure if it's unique: How I found it We have two 6s (red and black) with six cards between them that must be all the same colour (let's say red). Key fact: Now, to begin with, After that, Also,


10



5

Let's see.. Since most of the information is in point 4, it seems sensible to start the reasoning there. 4(a) If clubs are the trump suit, then both the queen with the fruits and one with the wheat ears can beat the jack holding a scythe. From this we get that the suits of the fruit and wheat queens must be Combining this with The queen of the ...


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