31

This seems to fit: The initial step was to replace all 1's (red) with a 2 (black) and all 9's with an 8: Then, whenever a red number was +/- 1 of a black number which was on the same row, column or box, the red number was changed to its other possible value. E.g. if a red 6 was on the same row as a black 5, the red 6 was changed to a black 7 as it couldn't ...


27

I have been asked by a couple of people to show the creation process for this puzzle, so here we go: Also if people want to see more of these strange, sudoku mash ups then I'll be more than happy to combine some new types :) Wrap-up: The Making Of This Samurai Pseudoku This is not a solution to the puzzle, but provides notes from its poster. This type of ...


10

Here is my answer for the new version of problem. Split the kids in groups of sizes: When the kids report back, there are the following possible outcomes. NOTE: The answer below was for the original problem, which turned out to be a duplicate. Split the group as follows: To recover the correct information from the kids' reports:


7

SOLUTION REASONING Some additional small deductions: Things just start taking off: The rest of the solution is similar to the previous analysis, just bouncing standard Sudoku rules against the possibilities for the compound grid...I don't remember there being any major logic leaps at this point.


5

Same conclusion, slightly different logic. Since they disagree with each other, we know: We also know one is human and one is a vampire. Combine that with the above, and we get: So, if However, if QED


4


4

Seems easy: or: Either way:


4

Development I will try to use a mix between the formal notation and natural language for convenience. This is a long development of rational logic. If you want to skip to the judging part, jump to the bottom. Let: Gr = Gregory; Ap = April; Au = August; Ju = June; A = First set of answers; B = Second set of answers; ~ = Negative (turns the premisse false); T =...


4

Gregory: I was not! April : I didn’t do it. August: April was. June : August says the truth Two of them said the truth, and two of them lied. So, in sum,


3

From the first set of statements: Gregory: I was not! April : I didn’t do it. August: April was. June : August says the truth We know that two are true and two are lies. Now If they're both true, then If they're both lies, then From the second set of statements: Gregory: It was June April: August didn’t do it August: April didn’t do it! June: Gregory ...


2

The guide knows that two kids can lie. There are some occasions: Now you just have to spot which groups have divergence of opinions and you'll spot who are the liars. Now, finally


2

I think: reasoning:


2

After trying some I managed to find at least one possible solution: This would make for the following deductions: This gives a conceivable age for the teacher, somewhat high but by no means impossible age for getting the last child (the teacher was referred to as a "he"), his age explains why the candles were too many to blow out, and the ...


2

The first liar is: The second liar is: So the ones telling the truth are: The one to blame is:


2

As a refinement to Pierre Schneegans's answer that includes your father's wish, you could wish:


2

Your wish could be:


1

You could wish for


1

You should wish for or something of that sort... Or even Or maybe (if you're feeling fun) ask for


1

Everybody knows that the first thing you should do when you find a genie lamp is to which will allow you to wish for anything you want. EDIT: Since you are only allowed to ask this genie for 1 wish, you should instead


1

I'll "strip" the problem to pure mathematical context: Given product and sum of some positive integer numbers it's impossible to tell what the numbers are, but it's possible to tell that none of them are equal -- unless it's given that the least number is not a perfect cube -- then it's possible to tell what the numbers are. What are the numbers? ...


1

The guide will split the groups as such: He then sends out the groups down each of the four paths, and when they return he has the following possibilities: Worst case scenario:


1

First Statements: Gregory: I was not! April : I didn’t do it. August: April was. June : August says the truth Given, two of them said truth, and two of them lied. There are only two possibilties, so a person can say either truth or false(lie). Choice - 1 Choice - 2 Second Statements: Gregory: It was June April: August didn’t do it August: April didn’t ...


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