21

Destination Genoa Hamburg Nantes Marseille Lisbon Origin French Polish Lithuanian British Spanish Colour blue red black white green Ferry Time 5 o'clock 6 o'clock 8 o'clock 9 o'clock 7 o'clock Load ? coffee ? rice bread The police should raid ...


18

Cardiff is :


17

Deductions Clues 1 and 19 tell us that Also, by clues 15 and 18, he must be wearing Clues 5 and 16 tell us that Clues 11 and 12 tell us that But we know Michael is in the 5th, so (also using clues 8 and 14): Clue 20 tells us the Marketing boss isn't at the 5th position, so by elimination of departments and ages, and using also clues 4 and 17: Clue 3 ...


15

If we take the question literally, we get the following:


14

It is not possible. Any solution to this puzzle must also be a solution to the 9x9 Queens puzzle. Luckily, that is a well-known puzzle. It has 352 solutions, but due to symmetry, those 352 solutions can be reduced to 46 solutions. After that, it is just a matter of checking against those 46 solutions. I found a page showing the solutions at: http://stamm-...


14

Answerer’s note This is long. Like, really long. Pull up a chair. I’ve been working on this for several days, and I think it’s finally correct. I may have made a minor slip up somewhere – please let me know if I have! But I believe almost all of my deductions are correct, and the back of the puzzle is broken. There have been three major ...


13

The canonical Einstein's Puzzle can be solved using a grid of possibilities, and the easiest way to do so is to track each of the possible states. Each letter in this grid stands for the associated entity: Nationality stands for Enlgishman, Swede, Dane, Norwegian, and German Colors (house color) stand for Blue, Green, Red, White, Yellow Animals stand for ...


12

I believe there are many solutions. One of them is this:


11

I know this type of puzzle simply as a "Logic Puzzle" or sometimes "Logic Grid Puzzle" (see Wikipedia entry here). It's impossible to come to a fixed number, because each clue may reveal a different amount of information. For example "The Englishman lives in the red house but doesn't own a dog" essentially has two clues. Even if you break those down into ...


11

Deductions 1. Charley's favorite only needs 3 unique letters 9. Dad's favorite starts the same as Charley's 3. Fred is a big fan of birds 6. Mary's starts with the same letter as Fred's 7. Heather likes mythical creatures 11. Peggy's was swimming in the water 13. Kyle's shares 3 letters with his name At this point the remaining animals are Aardvark, ...


10

I found one solution and i dont think there is another. The red marked four is the first number you can fill in.


10

Who wrote it? Solution: The resulting sentence is


10

I tried to make the solution as compact as possible


9

Irene and Yvonne are from the same state Michael and Emily are from different states The Patterson from Montana Finally, we can show that the clues are consistent with an example. And indeed this example fits all of the clues.


9

I think the solution is: (in format: name - old position -> new position) Reasoning: First, notice that we also know about and We should notice, that Hence Next, we should use that Knowing that Now, we know, that Finally, Megan mentioned, that


9

Setup We have four people (B,G,K,N), four objects sighted (balloon, kite, plane, telephone pole), and four days (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday). Here's the information we've been provided with: K's day was earlier than balloon day. K's day was later than kite day. G didn't spot the kite. Friday was either B's day or plane day (or both). N's day wasn'...


9

The only possible solution is The position of the three 1s is immediately clear from the minus signs. This helps a lot because we can now always disregard 1s for multiplication clues. Next to the 5 there can only be a 2 or 3. If we use a 2 we would need at least four 3s to solve the grid (We would need another 3 below the 3 directly below the 1). This ...


9

I think this is a valid pattern: I hope I haven't made any obvious blunders here.


8

Explanation: First of all place F somewhere, I put him in the bottom chair. Statement $3$ forces K to be in the right chair. Statement $8$ forces M to be in the top chair. Statement $4$ allows Sparrow be top-right or bottom-right. Let's assume Sparrow bottom-right. Statement $5$ means that Sparrow is directly facing E, so E is top-left. ...


8

After studying the puzzle I believe that finding a solution by hand would be feasible for a good mathematician with time to spare. I also believe that the number of possible solutions is quite big. Using a computer program I have found a solution: -42 22 23 7 13 11 -32 14 -23 16 15 8 19 9 -22 1 It has the following square sums: 4 24 ...


8

I still can't get 4 and 14, but here's my contribution to the bonus: I believe the solution to clue 14 is


8

This is quite easy to formulate as a 0-1 integer linear programming problem and then throw at a specialised solver. With no objective function to optimise, lp_solve takes less than a second to give: 2134567 1-1-3-5 4123756 3-5-6-4 6572431 5-6-2-3 7645132 If I ask it to minimise the total sum, it gives 2143657 1-1-3-5 3124576 4-5-7-4 7563421 5-7-2-3 ...


8

The solution: Verification from clues: The hacker with 36 wins isn't from Portland. The hacker from Los Angeles is either Yvonne Ware or the hacker with 4 losses. Yvonne Ware is from Miami. Hannah Hak has fewer wins than the hacker from Boston. Diane DeAscii has 3 more wins than the hacker with 12 losses. Of the hacker from Philadelphia and the hacker ...


7

There is not enough information to determine which person chose Actress E. Suppose we have a situation that satisfies all of the statements. One person chose A, one chose D and one person chose F. Out of these three people, at most one likes cartoons. Then we can switch E with one of the other two, producing another situation that satisfies all of the ...


7

Thanks to Morgan G I could get the last three sports I was missing. I also could not figure out 14. Answer: Martin Fuis: Dumber Nanoslav: Vastena Nanopi: Bert Naluga: Zakary Holiva: Clues: 1) The sportsman in the blue jersey finished at a better place than the one in the yellow jersey. ...


7

We start with some easy observations: "Damian knows only one of the thieves" and "the hacker is the only one which knows only one other": This implies that Damian is the hacker "The hacker and the overlooker do not attend to the meeting" implies that the accessory after the fact attends the meeting. "Bob will never know the accessory after the fact" ...


7

I think this solution is independant from the ones already published. Consider those blocks: A B C Place them anywere on your 6x6 board, and your get dozens of solutions.


6

Message: Solution: Image:


6

The answer is as such: Origin | French | Polish | Lithuanian | British | Spanish | Destination | Genoa | Hamburg | Nantes | Marseille | Lisbon | Ferry Time | 5 | 6 | 8 | 9 | 7 | Colour | blue | Red | Black | White | Green | Goods | ? | Coffee | ? | Rice | ...


6

From left to right, the lorries are: 1) Blue French lorry that arrived on the 5'o clock ferry and is travelling to Genoa.2) Red Polish lorry that arrived on the 6'o clock ferry and is travelling to Hamburg, carrying coffee.3) Black Lithuanian lorry that arrived on the 8'o clock ferry and is travelling to Nantes, carrying potatoes.4) White British lorry ...


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