29

(context: note that this question is asking for intuitive explanation why it's not equal, so a good answer would have to explain intuitively why the intuition that they will be equal is not the right intuition, which is what my answer is) Because the order of who opens a specific box first is important in this case. If Chris opens a box X after Bob, then ...


28

The phrase "in ads" likely means "in advertisements", where you are paying for character space. This suggests "eves" is an abbreviation, and that the answer will also be an abbreviation. EVE is an abbreviation for evening, and AFT is an abbreviation for afternoon, which comes before evening. Hence "AFTS" should be ...


26

I'm not sure if you don't understand the example puzzle, or if you don't understand how to find the solution. I'll explain both, just in case. The example takes a word/phrase that is 13 letters long with no repeated letters. That means it contains exactly half of the letters in the alphabet (26 total). Then the 13 remaining letters are written below, in ...


26

Maybe "the first" is number one or NO. I (Roman numeral 1), followed by L, an abbreviation for "left". We take all that and turn it around to make L I ON. The definition part would then be "at the zoo", which is not a great definition for lion as it's the wrong part of speech, but that's all I can come up with.


21

Salon is a news website - "eds" refers to "editors" here. The clue attempts to misdirect you into thinking of workers at a spa by putting the name at the beginning.


20

"Backs" means "last letters of the preceding words" here.


18

It seems easy enough to explain how most of this applies to But why in particular? (I've looked in a few places and everyone agrees that this specific thing is the intended answer.) I think there are two clues. The first is in this bit: My frettings loudly rush and ring Above the people and most clearly sing When I forth-fare on air I'll quote a ...


17

The most common solution is usually stated as "If I asked the other guard if the left door led to freedom, what would he say?" This makes the chain of statements "run through" the liar once and the truthteller once, so you know the door indicated is the wrong one. ("Yes" means you should go through the right door, "no" means you should go through the ...


17

Explanation


17

The answer is not ISSUED, no matter what some websites on the internet may say. I found what I think is the same crossword in another, older New Zealand publication. The crossing words give I-G-E- for this space, and the answer is INGLES. Definition is "fire corners", wordplay is SINGLES without its first letter.


16

You need to find some systematic technique. The technique will depend on the problem. Usually there is a regularity to the problem that you can exploit. In this case, I would note that the two squares that are not part of the main $4 \times 4$ do not interact with the lattice, so we can count them separately. For the lattice, work by square size. You ...


16

Based on his thought process: "But somebody insists that his profit is just 10 because he had used his first 10 profit to buy back the goat for 80. " But honestly, a better way to see it is that:


15

In more an English sense than a Puzzling one... In the question there is the keyword: That means if 100% true, then the statement is true. else it is false, even it is true 99%. In other words: Hope this helps!


14

The answer is: First row: Second row: The elements are:


13

This is a variation of the Seven Bridges of Königsberg puzzle. The answer is you can't trace out the pattern if more than two nodes are odd. We call a node "odd" if it has an odd number of lines to it, and "even" if an even number. (If a node is not an endpoint of the drawn line, then the drawn line must enter that node the same number of times as it ...


12

The coding phrase is: The resulting codex is: Found by:


12

As you have posed the question, the four conditions clearly don't work. The prisoner can't conclude that he won't be hanged because the judge said he would and the judge is truthful. As a perfect logician he would recognize that. It would be quite tricky to come up with a problem statement that works well. The paradox rests, I believe, on a rather neat ...


11

It appears to be two clues in one: "Chimpanzee, say" (answer: APE) "Circus equipment has APE at the centre." (The letters "APE" are at the exact centre of the word "TRAPEZE".)


11



11

First is No 1 (number one in an abbreviated form), this looks like NO I. Turn it - NOI -> ION First Left is L L ION


10

Setup We have four people (B,G,K,N), four objects sighted (balloon, kite, plane, telephone pole), and four days (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday). Here's the information we've been provided with: K's day was earlier than balloon day. K's day was later than kite day. G didn't spot the kite. Friday was either B's day or plane day (or both). N's day wasn'...


9

I am whole but incomplete This means a skeleton is whole considering it as a structure. But it is just a part of the body. So it's incomplete. I have no eyes, yet I see. You can see, and see right through me. This means skeletons don't have eyes - just the holes. By yet I can 'see' it refers to the 'see' in the word 's'k'e'l'e'ton. The same is meant ...


9

Systematic technique is definitely required. I came across this particular puzzle a few years ago on facebook and got into arguments with some people about the answer, with them arguing that there were or even more squares. Eventually I got bored, produced this animation which shows 40 different squares, and challenged them to show me one that I'd not ...


9

Yes, you are correct. Those mistakes should be fixed in order to make the questions analogous.


9

One possible answer that works for finding the next number, but not the entire sequence is This would imply the next number in the sequence is


9

Deusovi has already shown why the answer must be what it is, but there's one thing that can still be added to the answer. That is, actually drawing this many points on an actual cup. While I've already done just that (it was years ago), I have no visual proof that I actually did. So, a 3D render will have to do. Here's the same cup without its handle: ...


9

This tool looks pretty sophisticated! I think each red circle might have slightly different reasons for not containing a 2 hint, but as an example, let's look at the red circle on Row 1, Column 2. Suppose we did write a 2 there. Then: To complete Column 2, we must write a 4 in Row 3 (it can't go in Row 8 because of the box) and a 3 in Row 8. From there, we ...


9

The accepted answer explains this in terms of a four word expression, but that's not really necessary:


8

How can Albert, with the information he has after the second statement, make the third one? In your post, you have already accepted that Bernard was not told the 14th. This leaves the following numbers: 15, 16, 17, 18, 19. However, since Albert was told "July", before Bernard has even said anything, Albert has eliminated 15, 17, 18, and 19. This leaves only ...


8

Supposing, we have exactly 42 cars and and no other means of transport and supposing, The numbers at the beginning / end of the line denote the number of cars after each transaction.In my original solution, I supposed that In addition, the numbers at the end fit perfectly.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible