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CG has a correct and accepted answer, as verified by a python program I wrote that generates all possible chains over the range 001...360. Shown below are examples of solutions for other ranges of numbers, in a form that shows chain length, the chain's maximum value, and solution(s). C2 10 [(2, 3), (2, 5)] C3 21 [(2, 5), (2, 7), (3, 7)] C3 21 [(2, ...


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I think it's a safe assumption that the answer will be of the form: The reasoning is that Now, we want to get the longest sequence. To achieve this For instance, if we try Let's try another: Going even lower is not an alternative, since: Without a rigorous proof I'm going to say the combination is:


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I think that a Perfect Inquirey Word is such that Examples Why are they called Perfect Inquirey Bonus: Which is the Mega Perfect Inquirey Word


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Update Here is one of two solutions I have found for numbers ONE to NINETEEN: I have found a solution to the puzzle with numbers ONE to EIGHTEEN:


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This is a very interesting puzzle. I am not sure how to approach it rigorously, other than applying the deductions already mentioned, therefore I did a lot of trial and error. I have not come up with a solution yet, so I will keep trying, but I thought I'd share my progress as there have been no new developments on this problem for some time. Here is my ...


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