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A puzzle related to the game of chess. Questions about chess which aren't puzzles are off-topic but can be asked on Chess Stack Exchange.

Chess is a strategy game involving two players moving pieces on an 8x8 chessboard. If a piece moves where a piece of the opposite colour would be, it captures that piece. However, a piece cannot move past other pieces, or capture pieces of its own colour.

There are six different pieces, which are:

  • The pawn, which can only move forward except to capture pieces, in which case they move diagonally.
  • The rook, which can move horizontally or vertically anywhere unless blocked by another piece.
  • The knight, which can move a "knight's move" all at once, which is two squares in one direction and one square in a perpendicular direction. Unlike the other pieces, the knight can move anywhere a knight's move away if the square is not occupied by a piece of the same colour.
  • The bishop, which can move diagonally in any direction.
  • The queen, which can move horizontally, vertically, and diagonally.
  • The king, which can move horizontally, vertically, and diagonally, but only one square at once.

The goal of the game is to checkmate the other player's king – that is, to position one's pieces in a way so that no matter what move the opponent makes, the king is in a position of capture.

Questions with this tag can either be about specific situations in the game or about problems involving the way that the pieces move. Questions that only involve the board itself and none of the pieces should be tagged instead.

Please note that this site is only for puzzles and questions about puzzling. Any questions related to the game of chess itself without involving any puzzling element are more suitable for the Chess Stack Exchange site.

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