Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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I used the dictionary found at this github link: https://github.com/dwyl/english-words. I took a text file form the github link that had 370099 words in it and wrote an R script that calculates the score for every word in the list, and the rest was just a matter of filtering the results. At time of posting there was not a "no-computers" tag, though I imagine ...


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Write the general case as a@b The answer seems to be Some question are, do we limit a and b? For instance do we require a > b, what about a=b? This answer seems to require that a and b be positive because otherwise you get weird results for the 2nd and 3rd terms.


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Slightly higher score for N=5 N=6


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N = 3 N = 4 N = 5 N = 6 (I'm sure this isn't optimal but I don't have time right now to search for something better)


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7@6 is Because formula is


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Expanding on @Dason's answer:


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The answer may be because fits for the given examples.


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The answer is because the operator x@y is clearly the function: Alternatively:


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The result of 7@6 is because


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I wrote a program to check a list of words from https://www.wordgamedictionary.com/twl06/download/twl06.txt . In addition to which others have found, here are the words of each length with the lowest scores: No words over 12 letters long are listed, possibly at least in part because a Scrabble board is 15x15. Interestingly, there is an 11-length word ...


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Perhaps not best, but it has to be close:


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Partial answer: assignment: result:


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It's:


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I used an english wordlist from here, and a short python program to yield: Longest possible word under 10**6: Closest to 10**6: Code used: import numpy as np SCORER = {'a': 2, 'b': 3, 'c': 5, 'd': 7, 'e': 11, 'f': 13, 'g': 17, 'h': 19, 'i': 23, 'j': 29, 'k'...


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Note: this does not answer the question asked; it answers the question of finding the best possible value at most a million, not the longest length. Here's a Mathematica notebook (via Wolfram Programming Lab) that I used to check for better solutions: https://www.wolframcloud.com/obj/solly.ucko/Published/Longest_word_worth_at_most_a_million.nb In[1]:= ...


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Using the scrabble dictionary, and a short python program:


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Closest to one million: This is the sixth-largest number less than or equal to one million with no prime factors greater than 101. As for longer words:


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To get the ball rolling, I've got


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because:


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