Questions tagged [english]

Puzzles that crucially depend on some feature of the English language or that only work in an English formulation.

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10
votes
2answers
5k views

Another Rebus puzzle

Solve the following rebus puzzle: I I I I I I I I I ___________ O O See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebus
-6
votes
4answers
540 views

The four letters YHVH [closed]

What is the most commonly used everyday English word that contains the four letters YHVH in some order? Explanation: The answer is unique and clear, unless you try hard to stretch the rules that ...
-1
votes
2answers
2k views

Longest alphabetical sentence [closed]

What is the longest alphabetized (by first letter) sentence you can construct? For example, consider these "words": be, a, fish, elephant, crashed, dead If this were a sentence, it would be valid:...
22
votes
1answer
2k views

Riddle - He who holds the answer may enter

Here's a riddle I used in a game some time ago. Not the best riddle ever, but we had fun solving it. It was written on a translucent door, on the frame of which was written "He who holds the answer ...
17
votes
2answers
2k views

The hardest string of words to verbalise in english

To clear some confusion, this is just a riddle. I think maybe the size is whats intimidating some, but it can be solved as you would any other riddle. There are no new techniques used here. atop the ...
8
votes
1answer
2k views

On what basis have I split the alphabet into 4 sets?

I have split the 26 letters of the alphabet into 4 sets. Here they are: Set 1: $F G J L N P Q R S Z$ Set 2: $A M T U V W Y$ Set 3: $B C D E K$ Set 4: $H I O X$ Can you determine on what basis have I ...
5
votes
5answers
32k views

Word sets with no repeating letters

I know a set of six 4-letter words without repeating a letter (i.e. using 24 different letters). Here is an example: Are there sets of words with no repeated letters and having four 6-letter words? ...
20
votes
2answers
4k views

Alphabet splitting extraordinaire!

Here are three ways of splitting the letters of the English alphabet into two groups: 1) ABDOPQR; CEFGHIJKLMNSTUVWXYZ 2) BCDGJOPQRSU; AEFHIKLMNTVWXYZ 3) DFHIJLNOPRTUVXYZ; ABCEGKMQSW In each case, ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

What rule have I used to split the alphabet?

I've split the 26 letters (actually 25 letters) of the English language into two groups using a particular rule. Can you say what is the rule that I've used? First Group: A D E F G H K L M N O Z ...
3
votes
5answers
5k views

Longest Calculator Word?

Current Best; Babingtonites = 5371207621898; 13 letters We all know from fooling around with a calculator at some point in our lives, the when we turn a calculator upside down we can make words. For ...
-6
votes
3answers
453 views

Shortest sentence with 2 sets of synonyms?

Current Best: 13 characters This time I'm asking you guys to determine the shortest possible grammatically correct english sentence that includes 2 pairs of synonyms (different words that mean the ...
13
votes
14answers
4k views

Shortest sentence with two auto-antonyms

You have to use two words that are each their own opposite (auto-antonyms, contronyms, contranyms or whatever you want to call it) in the same sentence. This means that each of the two words in used ...
-4
votes
2answers
481 views

Confusing, Seemingly-Impossible, yet Correct sentence

What does this mean? "The girl that a man that a dog that a complex that a landlord that a friend that a cat plays with helps owns houses loved seen plays piano." Can you make any sense out of this?
16
votes
1answer
4k views

A grammatically valid sentence in English containing seven “that”'s in a row?

About 20 years ago on a forum now long gone, someone posted the above question. After people had had a chance to try it, he also posted the answer. I no longer remember the answer but really wish I ...
-1
votes
2answers
385 views

Oxford versus Cambridge - a geographical puzzle [closed]

What is a geographical similarity between Cambridge University and Oxford University related to their 'titles'?

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