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My friend asked me the puzzle,

  1. A couple have 9 children (none of them were adopted)
  2. Each child must be either a boy or a girl
  3. Half of that couple’s children are boys

How that can be possible?

I failed to answer. So, how it is possible?

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  • $\begingroup$ I believe this question is more lateral-thinking than logical deduction $\endgroup$ – Sid May 4 at 16:43
  • $\begingroup$ Maybe they have adopted someone $\endgroup$ – defectedWBC May 4 at 16:44
  • $\begingroup$ None of them were adopted. Updated the description. @defectedWBC $\endgroup$ – Sazzad Hissain Khan May 4 at 16:46
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It's a bit of , but

if both partners of the couple have children from an earlier marriage, let's say one has four and the other one has three, and they have two children together, then they have nine children in total, but that couple's children are only two, and one of them can be a boy and the other a girl.

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  • $\begingroup$ None of the children were adopted. Updated the post. $\endgroup$ – Sazzad Hissain Khan May 4 at 16:48
  • $\begingroup$ I can't come up with a better answer, but this seems to defy point #1 - in this scenario, the couple has 2 children, not 9. Under this interpretation, we'd have to say the couple has 9 children, but 7 of them aren't their children, which is a contradiction - it relies on a self-inconsistent definition of what it means to be "somebody's child".. $\endgroup$ – Nuclear Hoagie May 4 at 16:48
  • $\begingroup$ Let's see if there is any answer $\endgroup$ – Sazzad Hissain Khan May 4 at 16:49
  • $\begingroup$ I'm sure one of the more creative minds here will come up with a better explanation. $\endgroup$ – Glorfindel May 4 at 16:50
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If

at least 5 of the children are boys

then technically

half of the children are boys... plus more, but the question doesn't state "only half".

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Perhaps

All of the children are boys.
Half of the children are boys. The other half are, too.

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I guess you can say:

If the couple's firstborn is now an adult, you could no longer technically classify them as a child.
Then, if 4 out of the remaining 8 "not-yet adults"(or children) are boys, then we meet the necessary condition.

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Answer,

The couple have even number of child more than 9 and half of them are boys

Explanation,

If I say, I have 5 apples with me, then it's also true that, I have 4 apples with me, I have 3 apples with me and so on. Thus, the couple have 9 children does not violate that the couple have more children when we take other premises to be true.

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