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Inspired by @Stiv's This new puzzle type needs a name series, what is the name of the puzzle below?

enter image description here

Start by solving the (quite tough) Nonogram, then apply some and discover its name!

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  • $\begingroup$ Nice puzzle Jens :) Pretty sure I know what its name is and how to obtain it - if I get time tonight I'll write it up, otherwise I'll leave it for someone else to enjoy! +1 $\endgroup$ – Stiv Mar 21 at 19:51
  • $\begingroup$ @Stiv Thanks! Seeing as half the puzzle is semi-plagiarized from one of your puzzles (remember that plagiarism is the greatest form of flattery!), I'm not surprised. :) $\endgroup$ – Jens Mar 21 at 20:08
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(Thanks for the opportunity to answer one of these myself!) This puzzle is a:

NONOLINK

Both @jafe and @Rand'alThor have already solved the first-stage nonogram. The next thing to notice is that:

Each different colour represents a specific number. In particular, taking the colours in 'rainbow order' and starting with Red = 0, we also have Orange = 1, Yellow = 2 and Green = 3. What type of puzzle might a grid containing only values 0-3 be? Why, a slitherlink. The resulting grid can then be resolved according to the rules of slitherlink (a line forming one continuous loop; each numbered cell describes the number of edges of that cell which are part of the loop), like so:
enter image description here

To extract the puzzle's name, we then...

...see which letters in the original grid end up on the path:

enter image description here
If we start top-left and follow the loop clockwise, we read off the letters NONOLINK - a portmanteau of NONOGRAM and SLITHERLINK, the two puzzles that have been combined here...
Note that the OP has also left a little 'Easter egg' in the unused letters, which anagram to SLITHERGRAM, an alternative portmanteau choice for this puzzle's name...

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  • $\begingroup$ Augh, I considered this but only with green=0, yellow=1 etc. which led to a quick contradiction. Nice job! $\endgroup$ – jafe Mar 21 at 22:34
  • $\begingroup$ @jafe Gargh, that happens so often! I feel your frustration... $\endgroup$ – Stiv Mar 21 at 22:35
  • $\begingroup$ Well done! There is a little easter egg with the unused letters. Can you find what they spell? :) $\endgroup$ – Jens Mar 22 at 3:40
  • $\begingroup$ @Jens Looks like the unused letters are rot13(na nantenz bs FYVGURETENZ) $\endgroup$ – Avi Mar 22 at 19:12
  • $\begingroup$ You're 12 hours late to the party @Avi ;-) (See the last paragraph of my answer...!) $\endgroup$ – Stiv Mar 22 at 19:16
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Partial answer

Completed nonogram:

enter image description here

No idea what to do next...

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  • $\begingroup$ Argh! I finished the nonogram first, and your answer popped up while I was categorising the letters :-) $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Mar 21 at 17:56
  • $\begingroup$ @Randal'Thor Don't worry, I'm drawing a blank on the second part... $\endgroup$ – jafe Mar 21 at 18:13
  • $\begingroup$ +1 Amazingly fast solve of the nonogram! :) $\endgroup$ – Jens Mar 21 at 18:19
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Nonogram solution is as follows:

enter image description here

Now some letters

(S, N, A, M, I, K, R, H, I) are not bordering two different colours,

while others

(L, R, N, O, E, O, N, T, G) are on colour borderlines.

Noticeably, that second set of letters

includes N, O, N, O, G, R, ... and E, L, T.

The first set looks like it might be

an anagram of some Japanese name, like, I don't know, Narshmiki or something.

Other types of puzzle that come to mind, looking at this:

ANAGRAM (from the letters formed); POLYOMINOES (the shapes of the coloured pieces in the grid); TETRIS (could those coloured pieces be falling down?)

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  • $\begingroup$ +1 Amazingly fast solve of the nonogram! :) $\endgroup$ – Jens Mar 21 at 18:20
  • $\begingroup$ I love me a good nonogram puzzle :-) Had way too much practice with these. $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Mar 21 at 18:28

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