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  1. The first three letters are similar for the first and second words (eg, '' 'pre' ach'' & " 'pre' tty"). And three of them ends with letter 'e' especially one which ends with letter 'h'.
  2. Also, the first three letters are similar for the third and last words
  3. When you remove two letters from one of them, it'll mean, "noise of heavy things breaking"
  4. If you remove two letters from the other one, it'll mean, "step"

All of these words are synonyms.

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Possible solution with appropriate corrections to the question:

collapsed, crashed, collided, treaded

I took the liberty to make some grammatical and typographical corrections as follows.

  1. The first three letters of two words are the same

collapsed and collided

  1. The last three letters of two words are the same (assuming first $\to$ last)

collided and treaded

  1. When you remove two letters from one of them, it'll mean, "noise of heavy things breaking"

crashed

  1. If you remove two letters from the other one, it'll mean, "step"

treaded

All of these words are synonyms.

collapsed, crashed, collided, and treaded share a common meaning.

| improve this answer | |
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  • $\begingroup$ Hi, there's no error(s), the first three letters of the first word resembles the first three letters of the second word. Also, the first three letters of the third word resembles the first three letters of the fourth word. $\endgroup$ – user11039033 Mar 1 at 19:56
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After the clarification, the solution could be

cracked, crashed, tramped, trampled

  1. The first three letters of the first and second words are the same

cracked and crashed

  1. The first three letters of the third and fourth words are the same

tramped and trampled

  1. When you remove two letters from one of them, it'll mean, "noise of heavy things breaking"

crashed

  1. If you remove two letters from the other one, it'll mean, "step"

tramped

All of these words are synonyms.

cracked, crashed, tramped, and trampled share a common meaning

| improve this answer | |
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