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Two words are homophones

One that is paid
$\quad$ but cannot be bought
The other is stated
$\quad$ but cannot be undone

What are the two words?

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15
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Last one I swear:

I think it's

tolled/told

because

One is paid but can't be bought

if you've been tolled, you paid a toll but cannot buy one

The other is stated, but can't be undone

told is past-tense, so it can't be undone.

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  • $\begingroup$ Spot on! You got it right! $\endgroup$ – Ébe Isaac Feb 20 at 1:39
  • $\begingroup$ whew, that was a tough one! Only took four answers lol (deleted one) $\endgroup$ – TCooper Feb 20 at 1:44
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I want to say

due and do

Two words are homophones

Yep, these sound the same

One that is paid

People can "pay their dues", literally or figuratively

but cannot be bought

Purchasing a due doesn't make sense

The other is stated

do is a statement in some programming languages

but cannot be undone

I'm thinking this is wordplay, and you can't un-do "do" because if you did, it would no longer be "do" at all

I know this goes in a strange direction at the end. For the last clue... either I figured out the trick part of the puzzle, or it's just plain wrong, and I'm honestly not sure which. The one before it came from the meta-knowledge that programming concepts seem to show up disproportionately often on this site.

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  • $\begingroup$ I think more of weddings for the latter half of this $\endgroup$ – TCooper Feb 20 at 1:29
  • $\begingroup$ Nice try, the first clue fits perfectly well, but are due and do really homophones? Besides, undo is exactly what it means here :) $\endgroup$ – Ébe Isaac Feb 20 at 1:51
  • $\begingroup$ How would you pronounce "due" and "do" in a non-homophonic way? $\endgroup$ – SOLO Feb 20 at 15:16
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    $\begingroup$ Ah, answered my own question. I'm familiar with what seems to be the standard US pronunciation, IPA /du/, whereas you are possibly more familiar with IPA /dʒuː/ (more of a j-like sound at the start) for "due". That one seems more standard in the Commonwealth. $\endgroup$ – SOLO Feb 20 at 15:22
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Compliment and complement

Compliment - a remark that expresses approval, admiration, or respect. You can pay someone a compliment but it can't be bought.

Complement - to make something else seem better or more attractive when combining with it. You can state that one thing is the complement of another and the two things are often intrinsically linked

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Nice attempt, but not close :) Not all clauses were addressed. $\endgroup$ – Ébe Isaac Feb 19 at 14:06
  • $\begingroup$ Seems like the whole thing fits just compliment, except it being homophones(2) of course $\endgroup$ – TCooper Feb 19 at 23:52
  • $\begingroup$ @TCooper that's what I thought at first! $\endgroup$ – Bee Feb 20 at 10:40
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I think the answer is

Cheque/Check

One that is paid
but cannot be bought

You can pay a cheque into your bank account but you cannot buy a cheque.

The other is stated
but cannot be undone

In chess, you state "Check!" when the king is under attack and once this is done, it is against the rules to take the move back.

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  • 2
    $\begingroup$ The second one holds pretty well! But you can technically buy a cheque-book from a bank provided you have an account in it. $\endgroup$ – Ébe Isaac Feb 19 at 14:56
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    $\begingroup$ @ÉbeIsaac Technically yes, but they usually just give them to you. I have three I've never used. I mean, technically, you can buy almost anything. $\endgroup$ – hexomino Feb 19 at 14:58
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    $\begingroup$ But not the one mentioned in the question, I’m afraid ;) $\endgroup$ – Ébe Isaac Feb 19 at 15:01
  • $\begingroup$ @ÉbeIsaac Ok, will have a rethink $\endgroup$ – hexomino Feb 19 at 15:03
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    $\begingroup$ You can buy a cashier's check, which means the money is guaranteed to be available for the check. There's often a fee for this. Same goes for a traveler's check. And you can take back a "check" in chess, if you realize it's not actually "check". $\endgroup$ – computercarguy Feb 19 at 18:27
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I think it's

principle / principal

because

One that is paid, but cannot be bought

principal on your loan is paid, but you can't buy said principal. Similarly the principal of a school is paid, and as a person, cannot be bought

The other is stated, but cannot be changed

a principle is a basic truth or law, we state them, but cannot change them. i.e. gravity

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3
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It could be

Witcher/Whicher

because

One that is paid but cannot be bought

A Witcher requires payment, but will turn down any job he doesn't want, no matter the price offered.

The other is stated but cannot be undone

more of a stretch here, but The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher are stated, and after accusing someone, it can't be undone!

Side note:

Have a feeling I stretched too far, but thought it was a fun answer nonetheless

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  • 2
    $\begingroup$ I like this answer, I'll toss a coin your way. $\endgroup$ – Johnson Feb 19 at 23:23
2
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Here's a longshot.

attention
1. You can pay attention, but it can't be bought
2. You can be in a state of tension (state o' tension), and stress could have a permanent effect on a person

I have my doubts about the last condition.

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2
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This might be

Ad(advertisement)/Add

One that is paid but cannot be bought

Paid advertisement is any kind of advertising that you have to pay for it, can't be bought.

The other is stated but cannot be undone

Add - join something to increase the size or number

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