15
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Another puzzle in the spirit of the Density™ puzzle. Fairly hard I suspect. Enjoy!

enter image description here

Final Answer: (6, 7)

Version for the color impaired here.

Hint 1

All letters in the first word are unique.

Hint 2

Glyphs can be placed on top of each other. Some glyph parts are then covered more times than other parts.
It can be difficult to give hints when I don't know where people are stuck. Partial results encouraged.

Hint 3

There are 7 colors of the rainbow, starting with red. This info, plus a telegraph coding method in the diagram, should give you two letters of the second word, right off the bat.

Hint 4

Each of the figures on the left contain the first word. Each of the figures on the right contain the second word. Hence the title.

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I think you may be overestimating how easy (/ possible) the rot13(qrpbzcbfvgvba) is here... $\endgroup$ – Deusovi Feb 16 at 18:21
  • $\begingroup$ @Deusovi I know it's not easy, but it is possible. I've done it myself. The second word is easier than the first, though. $\endgroup$ – Jens Feb 16 at 18:46
11
+200
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Important preliminary note

The cleverest ideas in what follows are not mine but Deusovi's, posted by him in comments to the first version of this answer. Some of the others are Stiv's, also posted in comments.

If you like this answer, please go find something of theirs and upvote it.

Solution

The words we are looking for are

DOUBLE ENCODED. (That is: the words are DOUBLE and ENCODED, and they have also been encoded twice each.)

On each side of the image are

two representations of the same set of letters, overlaid and represented as follows: for each pixel, count the number of letters whose representation covers that pixel, getting a number from 1 to 7 (the number of letters in the RH word); convert that to a colour in "rainbow order": red=1, orange=2, yellow=3, green=4, blue=5, indigo=6, violet=7. (Background grey for 0.) So, e.g., a pixel used in exactly two of the letters will be coloured orange.

The left side

says DOUBLE. At the top we have the letters themselves on a 5x5 grid. (So e.g. the top-right pixel is yellow, meaning that 3 of the letters include that pixel: the O, U, and E.) At the bottom we have Braille. Here's a picture of all the letters so you can check that the numbers add up:

# # # # .    # # # # #    # . . . #    # # # # .    # . . . .    # # # # #    6 4 4 4 3
# . . . #    # . . . #    # . . . #    # . . . #    # . . . .    # . . . .    6 . . . 4
# . . . #    # . . . #    # . . . #    # # # # .    # . . . .    # # # # #    6 2 2 2 4
# . . . #    # . . . #    # . . . #    # . . . #    # . . . .    # . . . .    6 . . . 4
# # # # .    # # # # #    # # # # #    # # # # .    # # # # #    # # # # #    6 6 6 6 4

and the Braille:
oo  o.  o.  o.  o.  o.  61
.o  .o  ..  o.  o.  .o  23
..  o.  oo  ..  o.  ..  31
D   O   U   B   L   E

The right side

says ENCODED. At the top we have flag semaphore. At the bottom we have Morse code, with the following convention: each element (dot or dash) is represented by two pixels. A dot uses only the left-hand pixel. A dash uses both. (A real Morse code dash is 3x the length of a dot, but that would have made things too obvious.) Elements are written from the left, so to speak. Here's the semaphore:

. . /   . . .   \ . .   \ . .   . | .   . . /   . | .   2 2 2
. o .   . o .   . o .   - o .   . o .   . o .   . o .   1 o .
. | .   / . \   . | .   . . .   . | .   . | .   . | .   1 5 1
  E       N       C       O       D       E       D
and the Morse:
E .    1.
N -.   11 1.
C -.-. 11 1. 11 1.
O ---  11 11 11
D -..  11 1. 1.
E .    1.
D -..  11 1. 1.
totals 75 51 42 1

Credit where due

Deusovi suggested the colours-indicating-counts thing and the idea that the blocks below the "main" images are themselves other overlaid representations rather than merely indicating what letters to use in what order. Stiv suggested the Morse interpretation of the lower right (and also suggested a very plausible second word, which unfortunately happened to be wrong). I did some ineffectual scutwork trying out other interpretations of the image, all wrong; found the first word after Deusovi suggested how it all works; and found the second word, admittedly by telling a computer what to look for. Again: go and upvote some of their stuff!

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  • $\begingroup$ +1 for a lot of effort :) $\endgroup$ – Avi Feb 27 at 17:14
  • $\begingroup$ Heh. There should be no marks for effort. $\endgroup$ – Gareth McCaughan Feb 27 at 17:25
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I hope it'll give Jens some indication of the sort of thing that might be necessary in order to turn this into a solvable puzzle. (Or to nudge solvers in the right direction to solve it, if in some sense it's solvable already.) $\endgroup$ – Gareth McCaughan Feb 27 at 17:26
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ I suspect that letters are overlaid, and the color of each counts how many letter components are on each space: red means "used by one letter", orange "used by two letters", and so on. (Top left is the letters drawn out, top right is flag semaphore, bottom left is Braille, bottom right is... ASCII?) But if that's the case, the decomposition seems basically impossible. $\endgroup$ – Deusovi Feb 27 at 17:27
  • $\begingroup$ [...] Even if it does happen to be unambiguous, it would seem to require heavy trial-and-error, or coding, to actually do. $\endgroup$ – Deusovi Feb 27 at 17:29

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