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  1. I do it again and again, until I find what I seek.

  2. What is inside of me can always be changed.

  3. You can never predict what is inside of me.

  4. I can do many things and be called whenever you like.

  5. Without me, you cannot see your results.

  6. I am done only once for #2 and #3.

  7. Inside me is a list, from which you an choose.

There are 7 answers, not one answer. Each answer is related, because they all belong to the same category.

hint:

These are all words related to programming.

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I do it again and again, until I find what I seek.

dowhile loop

What is inside of me can always be changed.

default value of a field

You can never predict what is inside of me.

Uninitialized fields

I can do many things and be called whenever you like.

a subroutine or utility

Without me, you cannot see your results.

printline / output

I am done only once for #2 and #3.

initialize the field

Inside me is a list, from which you an choose.

dropdown

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I will grant you the correct answer since your answers seem to satisfy the conditions. For 2) i was thinking variable, and 3) random variable .. and 7) I was thinking array. But your answer works so +1 $\endgroup$ – Michael Rize Feb 22 '15 at 3:46
  • $\begingroup$ oh and I was thinking function with #4, because I program in Swift $\endgroup$ – Michael Rize Feb 22 '15 at 6:56
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Answer :

Search engine

Why:

Google,Baidu,Bing,Yahoo!,AOL,Ask,Lycos work until it find a result, we can't predict what will come, it always change, do many thing and we can call whenever we need help, we won't get results without it, it give list of results from which we can select.

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  • $\begingroup$ It is really like 7 mini riddles, so it is not one answer but 7 answers. $\endgroup$ – Michael Rize Feb 21 '15 at 11:53
  • $\begingroup$ @MichaelRize oh!.. ok thanks for the clue... will try to find it.. $\endgroup$ – Shana Kalyan Feb 22 '15 at 3:19
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1

for: A 'for' loop will repeat its contents until its end condition is reached. For example, for ( int i = 0; i < 10; i++ ){ printf("Again\n"); } will print "Again" over and over until the 'i' value reaches 10. alternate possibilities; 'while', or just the generic 'loop'.

2

mutable: A 'mutable' variable is one which can still be changed, even if it's in a context which declares that nothing may be changed. (taking 'always' to be the important word in "What is inside me always can be changed". If that's not the case, then 'variable' is presumably the intended answer)

3

volatile: A 'volatile' variable is one which the compiler is not allowed to make consistency assumptions about. That is, if we set the variable to be equal to some value, and then immediately check the value, the compiler would normally assume that the variable's value can't have changed in between where we set it and where we tried to read it. But if we've declared the variable to be volatile, then it can't make that assumption. This keyword is often used in multi-threaded code where another thread might have touched the variable, or when accessing variables representing hardware registers.

4

lambda: Alternates: 'function', 'procedure', 'method', 'subroutine', 'helper routine', etc. Basically, a bunch of executable code that can be called from anywhere else in the codebase.

5

output: Alternates: 'monitor', 'display', maybe 'console'. Or if I'm being flippant, 'eyes'. But regardless, generating results isn't enough; you have to display those outputs somewhere in order to be useful to the user.

6

specified: "mutable" and "volatile" are variable modifiers which can only be specified once per variable. That is, your int is either volatile or it's not. You can't have a volatile volatile int.

7

enumeration: An enumeration binds a list of named integer values to a type, so that type may only (legally) contain one of those specified integer values. So for example, enum foo{ bar, baz, quux }; defines an enumeration called "foo", which may hold the values of "bar", "baz", or "quux" (which are equal to integer values 0, 1, and 2). When a piece of code then asks for a "foo", you may only give one of the values in the enumeration.

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  • $\begingroup$ I gave you +1 , but your spoiler tags are not working and you were 2 minutes late, so awarded Marmy with the correct answer. $\endgroup$ – Michael Rize Feb 22 '15 at 3:48

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