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Don't worry, I won't let you overflow.

Is anyone operating on you? I won't let you overflow by that.

Do you want to link yourself? I won't let you overflow by that.

Is there an expression of the unspecified? I won't let you overflow by that.

Is someone really crossing the line? I won't let you overflow by that.

Do you have some clefts? I will mend them and you won't overflow.

What am I?

Subtle Hint:

Do you want to answer for an action? I am the action.

Moderate Hint:

Just let me go. You are the content.

Decisive Hint:

One letter modified, I am a language.

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  • $\begingroup$ Either you’re perfect, special, or just nothing. $\endgroup$ – Ébe Isaac Jan 15 at 9:11
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    $\begingroup$ I think the answer is rot13(Pybfher) but I don't have the mathematical knowledge to explain it so I don't want to write an answer that is based only on a hint. $\endgroup$ – JS1 Jan 27 at 11:37
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    $\begingroup$ @JS1 Correct. You should search that on Wikipedia. $\endgroup$ – Dannyu NDos Jan 27 at 11:48
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Guess based on the latest hint:

Closure (one letter away from Clojure which is a programming language)

Explanation:

Don't worry, I won't let you overflow.
Is anyone operating on you? I won't let you overflow by that.

A closure under an operation can even include unbounded sets as long as the specified operation always produces a member of that set

Do you want to link yourself? I won't let you overflow by that.

Transitive Closure makes a relation ("link yourself") transitive.

Is there an expression of the unspecified? I won't let you overflow by that.

Algebraic Closure is the set of roots of all polynomials ("expression of the unspecified").

Is someone really crossing the line? I won't let you overflow by that.

Closure as in Topology adds a boundary ("line") to a set.

Do you have some clefts? I will mend them and you won't overflow.

Convex Closure makes a set convex by adding points in its "clefts."

Hints 1 and 2 seems straight forward. As for hint 3:

Clojure is a programming language that run on the JVM (Java virtual machine).

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  • $\begingroup$ I feel that’s the answer too; If you don’t mind, may I improve your answer based on what I know in Math? I can explain each of the clues provided in the question. Or should I rather post it as a separate answer instead? $\endgroup$ – Ébe Isaac Feb 5 at 14:39
  • $\begingroup$ @ÉbeIsaac Sure you can go ahead and edit my answer. $\endgroup$ – JS1 Feb 5 at 18:37
  • $\begingroup$ Sure thing! Done. $\endgroup$ – Ébe Isaac Feb 6 at 2:00
  • $\begingroup$ Since your answer was the closest, I edited your answer to the correct answer. $\endgroup$ – Dannyu NDos Feb 10 at 23:25
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My guess:

Modulus

Explanation:

A modulus will not allow its operands to overflow. Modular arithmetic allows basic arithmetic operations. All values from a modulus (mod $x$) are bounded (between 0 and $|x| - 1$), so no one can actually “cross the line.”

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    $\begingroup$ If this isn't it, I'll be shocked. $\endgroup$ – Avi Jan 23 at 14:21
1
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I’m going to guess:

Warning, as in an error trap message in a computer program.

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0
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I think it is

Program.

As in

A computer program.

Because

Programs ensure that whatever errors you make, the buffer will not overflow.

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0
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It could be a

Barrier

Because

I don't have the knowledge yet to fit all of the clues, but a barrier can stop things from overflowing.

Language Hint: On Wikipedia,( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carrier_language ) Carrier is apparently spoken in BC, Canada.

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