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I have a numeric sequence: 1,4,5,5,7,9,9,6,6,11,13,11,? What is the next number in the sequence and what pattern does the sequence follow? This sequence has to do with prime numbers and the sequence can approach infinity. Good luck, I came up with this myself; I had one idea that I added more and more factors into.

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    $\begingroup$ puzzling.meta.stackexchange.com/questions/5712/… $\endgroup$ – Thomas Markov Dec 6 '19 at 3:00
  • $\begingroup$ I didn't downvote, but I will point out that a good puzzle on this site should be solvable without resorting to spoilered hints. In the puzzle you link, the small poem before the sequence narrows down the possibilities as to what the pattern could represent, whereas here it doesn't seem possible to figure out the pattern without looking at the hints. If you can move the hints you've provided out of the spoiler blocks, that would be a massive improvement! $\endgroup$ – HTM Dec 7 '19 at 1:02
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you very much! Will do. $\endgroup$ – Cotton Headed Ninnymuggins Dec 8 '19 at 0:21
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15 because it is the sequence of positive integers and to a prime you add 2

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  • $\begingroup$ This pattern doesn't work for the values in non-prime locations after the first one e.g. the 5 in the fourth position or the 6 in the ninth position $\endgroup$ – HTM Dec 7 '19 at 0:48
  • $\begingroup$ @Pilsnot3 Irrelevant items can have a function: to hide relevant items. However, if this is a mathematical sequence, my answer cannot be correct, at most accidentally. $\endgroup$ – user63710 Dec 7 '19 at 8:49
  • $\begingroup$ It is indeed 15 but the problem comes in with other nonprimes. $\endgroup$ – Cotton Headed Ninnymuggins Dec 8 '19 at 0:30
  • $\begingroup$ :) Then I will think on it why $\endgroup$ – user63710 Dec 8 '19 at 11:15
  • $\begingroup$ The reason primes have 2 added is because they have 2 ___. $\endgroup$ – Cotton Headed Ninnymuggins Dec 13 '19 at 1:32

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