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I know much of plants and healing

I marry many in a place of kneeling

One plant I know has two sides of a coin

A balance of nature they are conjoined

One drop too much, there is death

Just enough, you sleep with soft breath

I'm wise friend to a hot-headed boy

I'm consultant to a shy, pretty girl

I'm a crafty one, a sneaky man

I can always concoct a good plan

Both wanted to die, I prevented as such

I sent the boy elsewhere, not much

Gave the girl a way to sleep sound

In a day, I'd see her underground

Say, guess who I am!

And explain each line of this rhyme!

The title, why don't forget that too!

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    $\begingroup$ Given your affinity for chess puzzles, I thought from the title that this was gonna be a king-related one :) $\endgroup$ – HTM Nov 25 '19 at 4:30
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You could be

Friar Lawrence from Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet.

I know much of plants and healing

Friar Lawrence dabbles in herbalism and has much knowledge about the medicinal effects of plants.

I marry many in a place of kneeling

He is also a Catholic friar, and he's the one that tries to marry Romeo and Juliet to unite their families.

One plant I know has two sides of a coin
A balance of nature they are conjoined

After Romeo is banished and Juliet's marriage with Paris seems inevitable, Friar Lawrence instructs Juliet to take a potion made from a plant to fake her death in order to reunite her with Romeo. Hence, the "two sides of a coin" that are "conjoined" are life and death.

One drop too much, there is death
Just enough, you sleep with soft breath

This describes in greater detail what the potion does: it makes you appear dead for a while, but it's really just an extended coma, and you'll be fine when you wake up.

I'm wise friend to a hot-headed boy

That would be Romeo, whose hot-headedness lands him in a lot of trouble throughout the play.

I'm consultant to a shy, pretty girl

This is Juliet, who Romeo has a crush on.

I'm a crafty one, a sneaky man
I can always concoct a good plan

Another reference to the fake death plan, but this plan wasn't so good in the end.

Both wanted to die, I prevented as such

I don't recall either Romeo or Juliet saying they wanted to commit suicide because they were apart. But I can see the Friar acting to prevent that if there were such thoughts.

I sent the boy elsewhere, not much

AFAIK, Romeo was banished by the prince of Verona, not the Friar. Perhaps this is a reference to the letter he sent to Romeo requesting that he come back to Verona?

Gave the girl a way to sleep sound
In a day, I'd see her underground

Yet another reference to the fake death plan. Also, Juliet was buried in a tomb.

As for the title,

Romeo and Juliet has two opposing families, and their "kings" are probably their patriarchs: Capulet and Montague.

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  • $\begingroup$ Nice job! But you're explanations for lines "Both wanted to die" and "sent the boy elsewhere" and the title are not quite correct, though. How'd you figure it out? $\endgroup$ – Rewan Demontay Nov 25 '19 at 4:52
  • $\begingroup$ @RewanDemontay I actually got it from the first two lines! Helps that rot13(V unq ernq gur cynl va fpubby n srj lrnef onpx,) so I just had to search up some references that I had forgotten. But I'll have to wait for someone more knowledgeable than I to get the remaining clues. $\endgroup$ – HTM Nov 25 '19 at 5:08
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    $\begingroup$ @RewanDemontay Let's talk about that in chat $\endgroup$ – HTM Nov 25 '19 at 5:28

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