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I am trying to relearn a method for solving the 3x3 Rubik’s cube that I was taught many years ago by a departed relative – it is for this reason that I want to relearn this method, eventhough it is not the quickest method (e.g. there is no “white cross” in this method).

The method follows the following steps:

  1. Make top face and first row

  2. Make second row correct, there are two steps getting the row correct

    a. First step will fix (for eg) the piece on the left as you look at it, but this will change the position of the piece on the right

    b. Second step allows you to fix the piece on the left (again as eg) but will not change the position on the right

  3. Make the corners on the third (ie bottom) row, again two methods:

    a. First moves / swaps the positions of 3 out of the 4 corners (the “focus” corner is unaffected)

    b. Second changes the orientation of the 3 corners but does not change their position.

  4. Change the focus face to a different one (ie one that was previously one of the side pieces) then fix its second row using the same technique at 2b.

The only step I cannot remember is 3b.

I know my description is not great, but if you can point me in the right direction that would be great. Again I am looking to relearn this method, not a new one.

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This is probably the move sequence known nowadays in cubing circles by the name "Sune", applied to the bottom face.

The "focus" corner is the front left corner of the bottom face. The other three corners of the bottom face will be twisted anti-clockwise In standard cube notation the moves are: R' D' R D' R' D2 R D2
Or in words:

  • Turn right face anti-clockwise a quarter turn.
  • Turn bottom face anti-clockwise a quarter turn.
  • Turn right face clockwise a quarter turn.
  • Turn bottom face anti-clockwise a quarter turn.
  • Turn right face anti-clockwise a quarter turn.
  • Turn bottom face a half turn.
  • Turn right face clockwise a quarter turn.
  • Turn bottom face a half turn.
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  • $\begingroup$ Many thanks - your solution combined with some 30+ year memory (!) has got it back for me. The move is / was L' D2 L D L’ D L D2 $\endgroup$ – pom15595 Nov 17 at 8:01
  • $\begingroup$ @pom15595 That is essentially the inverse of the one I gave. If you are right-handed, you may prefer D2 R' D2 R D R' D R. $\endgroup$ – Jaap Scherphuis Nov 17 at 8:19

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