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I came across a puzzle about a missing letter in a primary school exercise booklet for selective high school exams in Australia. The puzzle is the one shown in the picture below. It looks like the missing letter is from a word of eight letters.

8 slice pie. Clockwise, the slices have: T, T, I, I, M, D, E, and a blank missing a letter.

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Looks to me the answer is

IMITATED, with the A missing

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  • $\begingroup$ I like the answer, but I'm left bothered a bit - is the pie shape completely inconsequential such that its just a jumbled eight letter word with a letter missing? The fact that the puzzle specifically shows the pie shape makes me think there's an ordering or pattern involved in some way. Am I missing something or is it just an odd way of presenting the letters? $\endgroup$
    – daroo
    Oct 14 at 11:11
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The answer could also be

TIMIDEST, with the letter S missing :)

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    $\begingroup$ Thank you, Mr Pie. It is possible to have an S here and make a funny word. :) $\endgroup$ Oct 7 '19 at 11:33
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    $\begingroup$ Yeah, compared to the accepted answer, I knew mine wasn't the intended answer. But, as they say, expect the unexpected! Thanks for the sharing the puzzle :P $\endgroup$
    – Mr Pie
    Oct 7 '19 at 11:35
  • $\begingroup$ That's true, Mr Pie. In fact, for problems like this, there may not be an intended answer. All reasonable possibilities are equally acceptable. Only, some may be comparatively more plausible. Thanks again for your participation and your suggestion of the solution. $\endgroup$ Oct 7 '19 at 11:45
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Another possibility, that uses the letters as arranged, instead of just being a straight anagram:

The missing letter is E.
Reading alternate letters clockwise you get TIME and TIDE.
(And for a bonus, reading anti-clockwise also works, giving EMIT and EDIT.)

This still isn't a very satisfactory answer because Y also works clockwise, giving TIDY.

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