13
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Please leave this puzzle for users with less than 200 rep.

Each of the following lines until the last provides a significant clue for solving the next cipher.

Letters have a natural order

C SEA WRA SA VTN YRE RP O RG SSE VI E UB TT H NE XE T PIC H RE SI

uifpwoehuwevjhtuxjpuhbma

531532133533154535414415

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    $\begingroup$ I think this is a nice idea. Not sure why the early downvote? $\endgroup$ – Stiv Sep 27 at 22:37
  • $\begingroup$ @Stiv Thanks, it's the nature of a community-run site I guess $\endgroup$ – Joshua Bizley Sep 27 at 22:37
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    $\begingroup$ But a new user from another active site will have 101 reps >< $\endgroup$ – athin Sep 28 at 2:40
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    $\begingroup$ Leave it for <200 rep people. $\endgroup$ – Manoj Kumar Sep 28 at 4:26
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    $\begingroup$ I have 221, just barely over the cap. Starts singing It Sucks to be Me from Avenue Q $\endgroup$ – ThePuzzlingPlatypus Sep 28 at 20:18
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So, the first cipher is a

Transposition cipher. I'm not actually sure which: I looked at the frequency of the letters, and determined it was probably a transposition cipher on a message in english. Then I noticed by chance the word "Cipher" and "Caesar", which were both "locally permuted" (i.e. if you consider the letters of a word in the plaintext message, then they will be 'close' in the ciphertext). From there I read the cipher from left to right, and guessed the plaintext).

and the ciphertext decodes to

Caesar wasn't very progressive but the next cipher is

The second cipher is

a progressive Caesar cipher, where the first 3 letters are shifted by 1, the next 3 by 2, the next 3 by 3$\dots$

and the ciphertext decodes to

The numbers are coordinates

The last cipher is a

Polybius cypher with key: ABCDE FGHIJ KLMNO PQRST UVWXY

which yields

Welcome to PSE

Oh, and thanks for

the warm welcome :)

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  • $\begingroup$ Good job :) The first cipher is an Alphabetical Disorder Cipher. Simply order each group of letters alphabetically. $\endgroup$ – Joshua Bizley Sep 29 at 17:25
  • $\begingroup$ Nice answer, well presented again! $\endgroup$ – tom Sep 29 at 20:21

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