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Can someone please help me to find the answers and the logic behind the 2 questions below?

The questions are from the test taken from the website: http://www.iq-brain.com/example/1

I could solve most of the questions, but the below ones I am not sure.

1: enter image description here

2: enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Possible duplicate of Hard questions from an IQ test $\endgroup$
    – Abel
    Sep 27, 2019 at 14:55
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    $\begingroup$ I have remade the questions, since I got a feedback that I should have ask only few questions at once. Im trying to learn how to use this forum... $\endgroup$
    – rrp
    Sep 27, 2019 at 14:57

5 Answers 5

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2:

Bottom middle. The last entry in a row is the sum of the first two minus 3.

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For the top one

could it be the bottom right: because the top row goes 2 lines x 2 lines = four lines. The next goes 1 x 1 lines equals 1. And the bottom goes 1x3 lines equals 3 lines.

For the second one:

It could be the bottom middle because the pattern is that in the row the first two shapes overlap to form the last section and then there is a reduction in the number of squares. Now the top row loses one square. The middle second loses two and the last must lose three.

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  • $\begingroup$ Just to add I did not look at JMP's answer before posting the edit before anyone accuses me of copying. $\endgroup$
    – PDT
    Sep 29, 2019 at 16:36
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  1. Bottom middle

The squares are cut up by the lines into a number of segments.

The number of segments is either 2,4 or 8

There’s always a repeat number of segments per row.

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For Q1:

The answer is the bottom middle. Three of the squares are made up of two other squares. The only square in the answer set that can be made using the others is the bottom middle. Squares

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First one, vertical columns: two lines - one line = three lines.

Answer:

four lines - one line = three lines = bottom right.

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  • $\begingroup$ I think there is a mistake or you must explain more, 2-1=1 $\endgroup$ Aug 22, 2020 at 12:34

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