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Write an indicative sentence whose truthfulness cannot be objectively determined before you try to find it out, but is immediately decided as soon as you begin to find it. The truthfulness must not subjective.

In the case where the sentence can be interpreted in more than one way (ambiguity), you should add context or explanation so the sentence has an unambiguous meaning.

To clarify by examples:

  • "This sentence is false" is a sentence whose truthfulness can never be determined. Similarly, any non-indicative sentence doesn't have a truthfulness as well.
  • "I am asleep" is a sentence whose truthfulness is always objectively decided, even though you may not be able to find it out.
  • "PHP is the best language in the world" is always subjective, despite being immediately decidable.
  • "Today is Monday" is a sentence whose truthfulness is always objectively decided. That you didn't look at a calendar does not affect the objective truthfulness of this question.
  • "I hit a man with a bat" is an ambiguous sentence.

None of the examples listed above is valid answer. However, the last sentence may be disambiguate with additional information, such as "the bat belongs to me".

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    $\begingroup$ I'm sensing that this question is a little too broad. $\endgroup$ – anon_user Sep 8 '19 at 7:56
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    $\begingroup$ How about: "I just flipped a coin. Was the result heads or tails?" $\endgroup$ – cinico Sep 8 '19 at 19:41
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    $\begingroup$ Well, another non-example could be "Can this statement be true?", whose truthfulness cannot be determined. $\endgroup$ – Cloudy7 Sep 9 '19 at 2:07

12 Answers 12

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How about:

This answer is going to be the accepted one.

:)

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  • $\begingroup$ Hey, you're not going to talk about a future event until it can be objectively determined, right? Like "tomorrow will be free of accidents" or "tomorrow will be Monday". $\endgroup$ – iBug Sep 8 '19 at 5:23
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What about:

A user has read this sentence.

Because:

You don't know if anyone has, but as soon as you read it you already know for sure it's true

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  • $\begingroup$ Same as my 2nd bullet point: That you don't know doesn't affect its objective truthfulness. $\endgroup$ – iBug Sep 8 '19 at 15:21
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To add onto the existing example sentence:

I am trying to find out the truth value of this sentence, or this sentence is false.

Because:

If you try to work it out, it is true, otherwise, it can neither be true nor false.

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There's a bar near here that has the following permanently etched into the wall:

"Free beer Tomorrow."

One cannot (absolutely) determine the validity of the statement without attempting its promise, whereupon, to his dismay, he finds out that there is definitely going to be

"Free beer Tomorrow."

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If I am getting the question right, then:

My answer will be up-voted.

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My try:

Read this sentence until it's end, fait accompli!

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My solution

This puzzle has no solution

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A sentence requires a few basic things. If the above statment qualifies as a valid sentence then so is this:

"Meow," said Schrödinger's cat.

And this:

Schrödinger's cat did not make sound.

It follows that:

The state in which the cat of Schrödinger existed was unverifiably predictable and although it is not known if the philosopher was a yogi or not, his attempts at non-binary knowledge through abstract thought, is certainly one for the catalogues of momentous thought.

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  • $\begingroup$ Nice try for these two! $\endgroup$ – iBug Sep 8 '19 at 15:43
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Maybe it's obvious but:

There is food in the fridge

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  • $\begingroup$ The truthfulness of this sentence always objectively exists, right? $\endgroup$ – iBug Sep 8 '19 at 15:42
  • $\begingroup$ Yeah but so does the cat in the box $\endgroup$ – Ante P Sep 9 '19 at 8:08
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Solution:

In this spoiler is the answer

The answer above is not correct.

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My attempt:

I will first try to determine the truth value of this sentence on an odd-numbered second.

You can also do the following, but it seems quite difficult:

Consider a running of the double-slit experiment. Make your sentence: "When I measure the particle, it will go through slit 1". Then attach an electrode to your brain that measures the particle as soon as you start thinking about the truth value of the sentence.

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Ok, now I am ready for my proper answer:

My previous answer was 15 minutes ago.

But even if I said:

My previous answer was 50 minutes ago.

It would still qualify, because it is

-Not a future event.

-You cannot decide it until looking away from it.

-Its truthfulness is objectively decidable.

and... most important of all

-You do not know if it is true until you begin to find out by:

looking for my previous answer

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  • $\begingroup$ The last line is wrong. See the 2nd bullet of my given examples. $\endgroup$ – iBug Sep 8 '19 at 15:13

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