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A farmer told me, without lying:

"you see this camel over there" showing me a camel eating, "it passed whole through the eye of a normal needle"

How is it possible, knowing that I too do not lie and there are no word games?

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  • $\begingroup$ lateral-thinking is probably the correct tag here. $\endgroup$ – Mordechai Aug 7 '19 at 21:32
  • $\begingroup$ why is it not close ? $\endgroup$ – Dattier Oct 3 '19 at 10:18
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He did so

as the camel was still a microscopic embryo.

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Perhaps the camel passed through

Needle's Eye in South Yorkshire.

In fact, according to the Wikipedia article,

"It was constructed approximately in the mid-late 18th century and believed to have been made in order to win a wager, where the second Marquis of Rockingham claimed he was able to 'drive a coach and horses through an eye of a needle'"

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It just

walked past a needle. The statement says "by", not "through"

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  • $\begingroup$ hidabroot.fr/article/136643/… $\endgroup$ – Dattier Aug 7 '19 at 12:10
  • $\begingroup$ there are no word games $\endgroup$ – Dattier Aug 7 '19 at 12:12
  • $\begingroup$ @Dattier Words have meaning. If you tell me you might drive by my house tonight, I’d expect you to drive past it, not through the middle of it. The difference there is pretty huge, and is not just playing word games. If you intend to say “through the eye”, please say that. $\endgroup$ – Rubio Aug 7 '19 at 12:57
  • $\begingroup$ yes, sorry my english is bad. $\endgroup$ – Dattier Aug 7 '19 at 13:01

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