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enter image description here

Hello everybody,

Has anyone ever seen something like this? I don’t even know what I should do with the puzzle...

Any suggestion or help is welcome!

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  • $\begingroup$ Do you have a source as to where it comes from? If so, please link it in the puzzle. $\endgroup$ – Rewan Demontay Jul 16 at 10:00
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    $\begingroup$ For a general solving method for these kinds of puzzles, see my answer on this question: puzzling.stackexchange.com/questions/62266/… $\endgroup$ – Jaap Scherphuis Jul 16 at 11:01
  • $\begingroup$ I might just have to make one of those for myself. I love puzzles like this. $\endgroup$ – computercarguy Jul 16 at 22:33
  • $\begingroup$ Has a correct answer been given? If so, please don't forget to $\color{green}{\checkmark \small\text{Accept}}$ it. (That indicates what the correct answer is, so there's no doubt; it also awards the successful answerer for their effort, and as an added bonus, gives you +2 rep for doing it! It's also just good etiquette for this site.) $\endgroup$ – Rubio Jul 19 at 2:04
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I haven't seen this particular puzzle before, but this seems to work:

enter image description here
Take the loop marked in pink. Push it through one of the holes, and around the knobbly bit's end. (The one that's closer to the string's end coming through the same hole we just went through.) It should now look like the string drawn in yellow.

Then, bring the loop around the other knobbly end, but pass it through the fixed loop of the other end of the string first. This is depicted by the green string; you should end up with something that looks like the light blue string.

Then, pull the loop back to its starting position back through the hole, and there should be only one string going through the pink loop now.

Repeat for the other hole, and the ring should come free.

(Edit note: my earlier answer went through an extra loop, which turned the whole method into a complicated no-op. This new one should work better.)

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  • $\begingroup$ Ha! Called it :-). $\endgroup$ – Gareth McCaughan Jul 16 at 11:19
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks everyone for your imput and help! We have been trying but so far we only make knots and are not any closer to any solutions... $\endgroup$ – Alex Almasy Jul 17 at 19:11
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    $\begingroup$ It worked! Thank youuuuu!!! $\endgroup$ – Alex Almasy Jul 17 at 19:24
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    $\begingroup$ @alex-almasy Glad to hear that! You can accept an answer as correct by clicking the checkmark next to the answer. (Hint hint :-) ) $\endgroup$ – Bass Jul 18 at 1:14
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The goal is almost certainly to detach the ring (and then to put it back) by careful manipulation of the bits of the puzzle. I haven't seen this exact one before (but I'm not an expert in such puzzles so that doesn't mean much). Solving them often requires you to do things like forming part of the string into a loop and passing it through a hole / around a piece of wood / through another loop, etc. Sometimes it helps to imagine that all the components of the puzzle are more flexible than they really are, so as to make the solution easy, and then try to "deform" the solution you get into something that works for the actual puzzle.

In this case, one thing I'd try is seeing whether that loop in the middle on the right can be got to one of the ends of the string, passed through the loop at that end and over the cube, and brought back again in some helpful way. (But, again, I'm not an expert on these puzzles and that may either be impossible or just make things worse.)

You might want to take frequent pictures as you do whatever you do, to make it more likely that once it's done you can undo it.

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The google results for this shows that it is a "Disentanglement puzzle"
These are a type of mechanical puzzle that involves disentangling one piece or set of pieces from another piece or set of pieces.

For the mentioned puzzle, the goal is to separate the ring from the puzzle strings by making loops out of the string and passing it through a hole or some wooden or string part of the puzzle.

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