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enter image description here

I am fully hopeful that you can crack this puzzle.

You need to answer with an explanation.

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  • $\begingroup$ @Asterisk please do not answer in comments. $\endgroup$ – Rubio Jul 5 '19 at 23:24
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My guess:

$30$

because:

In the first row, add $2$ to the $1$ and multiply with the $3$ to get $9$. In the second row, double the $4$ and multiply with the $3$ to get $24$. In the third row, we do both - add $2$ to the $5$ and double the $2$, then multiply to get $28$. If you now observe the pattern of bold/normal font for the first two columns, it repeats on the fourth row, so we add $2$ to the $4$ and multiply with the $5$ to get $30$.

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  • $\begingroup$ bold numbers doesn't matter $\endgroup$ – Rajendra Singh Jul 5 '19 at 9:49
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Answer: Idea similar JonMarkPerry, but slightly different, my guess:

60

RULES:

1)BOLD NUMBER = BOLD NUMBER +2

2) right number is multiple of first two in a row multiply by number of simple divisors of each number(beginning one, not+2) different from it (EX for 3 is 1, 4 is 2 and 1, for 6 is 3 and 2 and 1 and so on)

3)right number is not bold only if first two are not bold

4) using those rules we get (1+2)*3*1*1=9(bold) 3*4*1*2=24(not bold) (2+2)*(5+2)*1*1=28(bold) so (4+2)*5*2*1=60(bold)

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  • $\begingroup$ The number is bold or not, doesn't make sense $\endgroup$ – Rajendra Singh Jul 5 '19 at 9:46
  • $\begingroup$ @RajendraSingh What exactly doesnt make sence? I totally agree that number is bold or not $\endgroup$ – Igor sharm Jul 5 '19 at 10:01
  • $\begingroup$ as @Matti said- I thought that the bold numbers don't matter. I agree $\endgroup$ – Rajendra Singh Jul 5 '19 at 10:03
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My solution is...
$l = left$
$r = right$

$2l + r = 15$
$-l + r = 4 | +l$
$r = 4 + l$

$6l = 15 |:6$
$l = 2.5$
$r = 6.5$

So the next number is:

$2l + 28 = 33$

(I thought that the bold numbers doesn't matter)

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  • $\begingroup$ I don't think the process to get the answer can be complex like this $\endgroup$ – Rajendra Singh Jul 5 '19 at 9:48

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