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The sentence below is out of alphabetical order, but can you prove it? As always, good luck!

All because blue cheese fell happily.


Hints

The language tag is used to denote that the puzzle has something to do with language in particular, whether it's a foreign language, or just a property of a specific language.

The quick brown fox, jumps over the lazy dog.

The answer is based around the English language.

Welcome to word class.

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  • $\begingroup$ I Didn't understand the question. What do you mean by alphabetical order $\endgroup$ – Tojrah May 2 at 1:00
  • $\begingroup$ @Tojrah The language and lateral thinking tags are hints on how to solve this enigmatic puzzle. Best of luck! $\endgroup$ – PerpetualJ May 2 at 1:08
  • $\begingroup$ Are we working with the text as we see it? No invisible characters or non-standard character encodings? $\endgroup$ – MichaelMaggs May 2 at 10:30
  • $\begingroup$ @MichaelMaggs I’ll be posting a hint later today to try and help out. I can tell you that there are no invisible characters, and no special encodings. $\endgroup$ – PerpetualJ May 2 at 10:31
  • $\begingroup$ Is the comma after the word 'fox' in the hint significant? I hope it's not something like rot13("oyhr purrfr" fubhyq or vaqrkrq haqre "purrfr, oyhr".) Another hint now, maybe? $\endgroup$ – MichaelMaggs May 17 at 16:14
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They are English words but out of alphabetical order in:

the Kiowa language, which according to Wikipedia is:
A, AU, E, I, O, U, B, F, P, V, D, J, T, TH, G, C, K, Q, CH, X, S, Z, L, Y, W, H, M, N

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A second try, in case you didn't like the first one:

Almost all of the letters in the quoted sentence can be found within the phrase "alphabetical order, but can you prove it. As always, good luck". The exception is the letter f, which perhaps comes from the word "of".

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The words of the sentence aren't ordered alphabetically, because

in Czech or Slovak alphabets, CH (cheese) stands after H (hapilly):

See: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, CH, I, J, K ...

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