4
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My beginning is the beginning of glass

My middle gives you a hand take one,

a slang patriarch, and early college credit.

I end with a downtrodden stone.

What am I?

As usual, please include an explanation for each line in your final answer. I'm not entirely sure if the "knowledge" tag is needed, at least for native English speakers; I figured that I was better safe than sorry.

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  • $\begingroup$ Usually "word" is enough to indicate that some English knowledge is also required, in a way. Knowledge refers to a specific broad scope of information, and trivia refers to a very specific scope of information, and one that is usually impractical. $\endgroup$ – North Apr 18 at 23:04
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    $\begingroup$ Knowledge is an appropriate tag here though, since some research will be required for general scope of ideas, not just because of English. $\endgroup$ – North Apr 18 at 23:05
4
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I am pretty sure you are

SANDPAPER

Because...

My beginning is the beginning of glass

Glass begins as SAND

My middle gives you a hand take one,
a slang patriarch, and early college credit.

"A hand take one" might be a PAW with the last letter taken away, for PA.
A slang patriarch is also a PA, and you get early college credit via AP courses.
Together these give PAP

OP indicates the intent here was literally HAND with the first letter taken away, for AND.
That, with the PAP clearly clued by the "patriarch" line, gives a "middle" of ANDPAP.
That's not a word, and the usual expectation is that the pieces are words.
So I reject that and go with the interpretation I put above. :)

I end with a downtrodden stone.

PAPER beats (a thus downtrodden) stone in roshambo (rock-paper-scissors). (thanks @North)

The title ...

SANDPAPER is, of course, rough.

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  • $\begingroup$ Whoops-a-daisies, didn't realize that the custom was that it had to be a word. Was just thinkin that all items in lines 2-3 could be found in the middle area of the word. Regardless, checkmark coming soon! $\endgroup$ – Brandon_J Apr 19 at 0:15
  • $\begingroup$ I did not think an affix had to be a word either. For example, are we to say that the word "wonderful" has no suffix because what would have been its suffix what have not been a word? $\endgroup$ – Feeds Apr 19 at 3:11
  • $\begingroup$ @user477343 In general, no. For these style puzzles, though, the convention is that the "prefix" and "infix" and "suffix" parts of the answer word are words (or common abbreviations) in their own right. $\endgroup$ – Rubio Apr 19 at 5:18

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