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What is the most possible checkmates in one without promoted units in a position? It must all be legal, of course. Promotions are allowed in the game, but the position is not allowed to start with promoted pieces.

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After some asking on Matplus a few weeks ago, here are the final records.

Without Promotions-43

: enter image description here

The 43 Mates:

Pd2-1, Pf2-2, Ph2,1, Nc3-2, Nh4-2, Qd4-4, Kf7-6, Rg5-12, Be4-13

With Promotions-47

enter image description here

The 47 Mates:

Pa7-1, Pd7-1, Ph7-1, Ne8-2, Qf5-4, Nd8-8, Be5-13, Rc4-14

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Here is 36, contributions given by:

Bishop d4 moves: 13, Rook c2 moves: 14, Knight g4 moves: 2, Queen moves: 7

Picture:

enter image description here

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I have 35, with the following:

Nd7: 2
Pg7: 1 (Q or B)
Rc6: 14
Nb5: 2
Re4: 14
Qf3: 2 - 4 possible queen checks leave the rook at e4 unprotected

Picture:

enter image description here

The secret to the moves here is:

Double protecting all positions around the king, so that I could move any of those pieces to check without worrying that I was leaving a spot open for the king to move into.

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  • $\begingroup$ @RewanDemontay You are correct. I have an e4 rook problem. $\endgroup$ – Joel Rondeau Apr 24 '19 at 21:21
  • $\begingroup$ Well, updated answer for 36, while I look for a solution. $\endgroup$ – Joel Rondeau Apr 24 '19 at 21:25
  • $\begingroup$ Yeah, that was the whole "thought both pawn promotions counted separate" $\endgroup$ – Joel Rondeau Apr 25 '19 at 13:02
  • $\begingroup$ It's 36 if I put a pawn at d3, but that still blocks half the possible queen checks. $\endgroup$ – Joel Rondeau Apr 25 '19 at 13:04
  • $\begingroup$ Well the, no point messing with this one unless I find a LOT more checks. $\endgroup$ – Joel Rondeau Apr 25 '19 at 13:19
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Here is an alternate solution with 47 mates that I found, originally posted here: https://www.chess.com/forum/view/more-puzzles/diams-totally-puzzled-213-page-66-ndash-mate-in-one?page=2

enter image description here

Hmmm... I also just found out at matplus this alternate solution was first found in 1882... oh well! There's nothing new under the sun I guess...

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ You can right click the picture, then paste it here $\endgroup$ – UnidentifiedX Apr 5 '20 at 4:03

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