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I forgot my password again! I changed it a few days ago but already forgot!

What is my phone's password this month?

enter image description here

Hint #1:

My passwords do tend to be fairly long, as mentioned in the comments.

Hint #2:

The number itself may not have been on the moon, but maybe something it shares a trait with.

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    $\begingroup$ As a small recommendation, linked with Rubio's answer, if the January 2018 puzzle's hint also applies to this question, it would be better to also place it. It's better to get a repeated hint than a missing yet important hint $\endgroup$ – Belhenix Apr 2 at 22:30
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    $\begingroup$ @Belhenix I added that hint as well as one more. I'll keep this in mind for all future puzzles too, thanks! $\endgroup$ – Tyler22Alex Apr 3 at 0:32
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Your lock code is

115132219018763992565095597973971522401

The reason

Neil Armstrong was the first man on moon. Armstrong number is an n-digit number in which sum of n-th power of each digit is equal to the number itself. E.g. - 371 = 3^3 + 7^3 + 1^3. (3 digit number so power of 3).

Using this rationale, we find that

115132219018763992565095597973971522401 is the largest known armstrong number as per this and has 39 digits.

No wonder you forgot it!

Bonus reading - wikipedia

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    $\begingroup$ Nice job! You got it! Side note: I actually used this (and all other password puzzles I post) as my password and I don't think I've forgotten one yet :) I like numbers! $\endgroup$ – Tyler22Alex Apr 3 at 14:29
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I believe the answer is

1000

I think that we are supposed to take this literally as

"first of the word moon, which is M (1000 in Roman)"

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    $\begingroup$ A tag of the puzzle is knowledge. (ROT13) Oryvrir vg be abg, lbh pna gnxr bhg yrggref sebz "Ebzna Xabjyrqtr" arprffnel gb znxr gur jbeq "zbba". Creuncf lbh ner ba gur evtug genpx, ubjrire gur ahzore zvtug or n ovg fznyy nppbeqvat gb Uvag 1. $(+1)$ though! $\endgroup$ – Mr Pie Apr 3 at 0:36
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    $\begingroup$ Very interesting answer, but not quite! Maybe take a look at the hints I added? $\endgroup$ – Tyler22Alex Apr 3 at 0:44
  • $\begingroup$ Yeah, answer was from before the hints. Nice puzzle though. $\endgroup$ – APrough Apr 3 at 15:06
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Okay, so first of all, I checked the image and contrast to see if there was something hidden there. I couldn't find anything. Next, I followed the literal interpratation of the text, that is:

The first man to walk on the moon was Neil Armstrong. I tried looking for any items that he wore that would have a serial number or something like that. According to this site, https://www.fratellowatches.com/speedy-tuesday-speedmaster-professional-105-012-with-serial-number-2400xxxx/, the Speedwatches were the only ones used on the moon.

Neil Armstrong's serial number on his watch (again, according to the site) is 24002981, which I believe is your password.

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    $\begingroup$ As a number, you don't need people onboard to be first on the moon. $\endgroup$ – Arnaud Mortier Apr 2 at 18:20
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    $\begingroup$ On the right track with Armstrong, but looking in the wrong direction for the number. Maybe what you've got so far and my second hint will get you closer! $\endgroup$ – Tyler22Alex Apr 3 at 4:31
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Perhaps the password is

1959

Explanation:

Luna 2 was the first spacecraft to make contact with the moon. According to Wikipedia, Luna 2 was engraved with "1959 январь" and "СОЮЗ СОВЕТСКИХ СОЦИАЛИСТИЧЕСКИХ РЕСПУБЛИК"1, making "1959" the first number on the moon. Furthermore, phone passcodes are typically 4 digits long, so using a year as a passcode makes sense.

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    $\begingroup$ Pursuant to Hint 1 however, this does not quite match, thus making it unlikely to be the answer; nevertheless, I like it! $(+1)$ :P $\endgroup$ – Mr Pie Apr 3 at 0:28
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    $\begingroup$ I think this was posted before I added the first hint, so I apologize for that, but good thinking nonetheless! $\endgroup$ – Tyler22Alex Apr 3 at 4:36
  • $\begingroup$ @Tyler22Alex oh, it was? My bad. (Also, is it nevertheless or nonetheless...? Or are they interchangeable?) $\endgroup$ – Mr Pie Apr 3 at 11:03
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Perhaps the password is

11 or eleven or some variation of it

because

Apollo 11 was the first manned mission to the moon, and it had the “largest number” of anything that was first to the moon, greater that Luna 2, which was the first successful unmanned spacecraft to land.

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    $\begingroup$ I see the number in Apollo! $(+1)$ $\endgroup$ – Mr Pie Apr 3 at 0:37
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    $\begingroup$ Interesting idea! However I think you posted this before I added the first hint, so I apologize for that. $\endgroup$ – Tyler22Alex Apr 3 at 4:34
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There are a lot of ways to find numbers that are "first on the moon", so this question may need some more specificity to rule out answers; right now there doesn't seem to be any criteria beyond "the largest" number an answerer might justify somehow, which is probably too broad.


It's possible the password is

201901030226

We know that

OP uses passwords that are usually pretty long, as we learned in Unlock My Phone! January 2018.
We're looking for the largest "first on the moon" number.

China recently made the first landing ever on the far side of the moon - the robotic
Chang'e 4 mission touched down in the Von Kármán Crater at 10:26am Jan. 3, Beijing time.
This is clearly a "first" on the moon, both for China (first moon landing at all) and for humanity (first landing on the dark side of the moon).

If we take the date and time, in GMT, of this moon landing, we get 201901030226. Seconds were not given, so this is the most specific timedate stamp we can get.

Since this is the most recent moon landing, if we were to consider any other "first" - by nation, by mission type, whatever - and take their corresponding YYYYMMDDHMM number, this one would be the largest.

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    $\begingroup$ Hopefully my hint helped a bit, and I'll add more hints as time goes by if people still aren't getting it. $\endgroup$ – Tyler22Alex Apr 3 at 4:33
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I think it's:

23.9 billion

Explanation:

According to Wikipedia: In January 1969, NASA prepared an itemized estimate of the run-out cost of the Apollo program. The total came to $23.9 billion

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    $\begingroup$ Good thinking but not quite! Maybe look at the hints I added. Good luck! $\endgroup$ – Tyler22Alex Apr 3 at 4:35
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The answer is

9.5 Because it's the boot size Neil Armstrong had when first setting foot on the moon.

Thus it was "the largest number to be first on the moon"

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