6
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Example:

  • one repeated letter - bitter
  • two consecutive repeated letters - bassoon
  • three consecutive repeated letters - bookkeeper

I've tried to find a four-times-repeated example but failed.

(Question edited: was “Is there an English word with four consecutive repeated letters?”)

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migrated from english.stackexchange.com Jan 14 '15 at 19:26

This question came from our site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts.

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Yellowwooddoor - a door made out of yellowwood (acknowledged as a real Scrabble word). It even has an extra double letter (ll) though it's not consecutive.

(I can't believe how much time I just spent thinking about this. Time to get a life.)

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  • $\begingroup$ LOL............ $\endgroup$ – Centaurus Jan 12 '15 at 22:57
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    $\begingroup$ And "yellowwood door reeffecting" (that is, "putting a yellowwood door into proper working order") has seven consecutive two-letter pairs. $\endgroup$ – Sven Yargs Jan 12 '15 at 23:29
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    $\begingroup$ Or figure out how to charge for billable hours. $\endgroup$ – Little Eva Jan 13 '15 at 4:31
  • $\begingroup$ Yeah, right. I smell BBSS... :) Show us the word in a dictionary or Scrabble word list and then I'll upvote you. $\endgroup$ – paolo Jun 15 '16 at 15:09
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    $\begingroup$ Sorry, according to the online official scrabble dictionary, 'yellowwood' is, but 'yellowwooddoor' is not. $\endgroup$ – TrojanByAccident Oct 4 '16 at 0:11
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The word list on my Mac has one:

$ grep '\(.\)\1\(.\)\2\(.\)\3\(.\)\4' /usr/share/dict/words
subbookkeeper
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    $\begingroup$ According to dictionary.com "FAQ" (I really doubt it's asked that frequently) it's the only one. $\endgroup$ – Spehro Pefhany Jan 12 '15 at 22:08
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    $\begingroup$ @SpehroPefhany It's probably a common trivia question. $\endgroup$ – Barmar Jan 12 '15 at 22:10
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    $\begingroup$ @SpehroPefhany It's entered into pop culture just like "antidisestablishmentarianism" as the longest word has (although I don't think it's the longest word anymore). As Barmar said, it's a common trivia question, and I recall a kids' story (I think it might have been Encyclopedia Brown) that used the fact as a plot point. $\endgroup$ – Nicole Jan 12 '15 at 22:39
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    $\begingroup$ @SpehroPefhany Also, "frequently" in FAQ should not generally be interpreted literally. Often the questions in an FAQ are not actually asked frequently, but just information that you want the readers to know. It's a generalization, and a shorthand way of saying "Important facts". $\endgroup$ – Barmar Jan 12 '15 at 22:42
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    $\begingroup$ @SpehroPefhany A childhood without Encyclopedia Brown is no childhood at all! $\endgroup$ – Nicole Jan 13 '15 at 3:36
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Binnéessiippeele has 6 consecutive pairs and is the name of the "River Crow" tribe of native Americans.

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    $\begingroup$ Hi there! I like your word (wow, I have never seen a word with so many consecutive pairs of letters!), however, the original poster asked specifically for English words, so this answer is not really valid. Good work, though! $\endgroup$ – hat Sep 22 '18 at 15:31

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