7
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Grandpa loves numbers. He is always asking me riddles about them. (Annoying if you ask me)

He says:

"These numbers are different than others. Even unique you might say. There may be others in this group but I think I captured most

8

2

45

4

1

Can you tell me why?"

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4
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Tell Grandpa that I think he's talking about numbers that have

single word homophones: 8 - ate, 2 - to/o, 45 ~ fortify, 4 - for/e, 1 - won.

Are these numbers unique - maybe could include

6 - sicks (Br informal).

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    $\begingroup$ Grandpa does not know about 6 but other than that he agrees with you fully. $\endgroup$ – DEEM Jan 17 at 19:35
  • $\begingroup$ @DEEM - I will set forth on a $\pi$ which I spy with my $i$. Give my regards to Grandpa for this original series. $\endgroup$ – Tom Jan 18 at 9:54
  • $\begingroup$ Great. Grandpa said that including "pi" would have given it away quickly. $\endgroup$ – DEEM Jan 18 at 14:29
1
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I think that

all these numbers contains every letters that compose every number in 1-99, and none of the numbers from your list is composed with the letters from the others listed
I checked by seeing if one of these number could be composed by all the other and I found that:
8 : g and h don't appear in another number from the list
2: w doesn't appear in another number from the list
45: y and v don't appear in another number from the list
4: u doesn't appear in another number from the list
1: n doesn't appear in another number from the list

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    $\begingroup$ I don't understand how they are different/unique though. for instance: rot13(lbh pbhyq ercynpr rvtug jvgu rvtugl-svir naq gura lbh jbhyqa'g rira arrq sbegl-svir) $\endgroup$ – SteveV Jan 17 at 16:30
  • $\begingroup$ Good point SteveV $\endgroup$ – DEEM Jan 17 at 16:49
0
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I guess

One number can be obtained using the other 4 numbers and basic mathematical operations such as +, -, ×, ÷ and square root.

For example,

8 = (square root( 45 + 4) + 2) - 1 and so on.

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  • $\begingroup$ Note there is no MATH tag here $\endgroup$ – DEEM Jan 17 at 17:50

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