24
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My plumber gave me a perilous job--his figurines had been stolen (3). I had to endure Ian's sobbing before he would tell me the problem under his feet (2). It turns out the girl he dated had taken his possessions, leaving only cheese in the fridge (2).

After my day's investigations, some ice-cream felt sublime (1). No barriers remained, and my main goal had been met (2). When Ian asked how things were going, I told him the day had been ________.

note: The numbers do not refer to the length of a word.

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28
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The day had been ...

... fruitful.

Why?

Each sentence contains as many names of fruit as indicated by the number in parentheses. The fruit are included phonetically, so the spelling in the sentence may differ:

My plumber gave me a perilous job – his figurines had been stolen. I had to endure Ian's sobbing before he would tell me the problem under his feet. It turns out the girl he dated had taken his possessions, leaving only cheese in the fridge.

After my day's investigations, some ice-cream felt sublime. No barriers remained, and my main goal had been met.

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  • $\begingroup$ Oh ๐ŸŒ๐ŸŒ๐ŸŒ๐ŸŒ๐ŸŒ๐ŸŒ๐ŸŒ๐ŸŒ๐ŸŒ๐ŸŒ๐ŸŒ๐ŸŒ๐ŸŒ๐ŸŒ๐ŸŒ! โ€“ Elephant Child's brothers $\endgroup$ – hat Jan 10 at 12:21
  • $\begingroup$ I can't work out how the fourth item or the next to last item satisfy the explanation. $\endgroup$ – phoog Jan 10 at 19:50
  • $\begingroup$ @phoog: It's "endure Ian's" and "barriers". (That last one may be a stretch, because the final "r" seems to be in the way.) $\endgroup$ – M Oehm Jan 10 at 19:54
  • $\begingroup$ Oh I see. I'd never heard of the former. For the latter, not only the final R is a problem, but the vowel in the first syllable (in my experience, many non-native speakers from Europe think that these are the same vowel, but my not recognizing the connection here is a good example of how they are not). $\endgroup$ – phoog Jan 10 at 20:02
  • $\begingroup$ I was going for the first two syllables of "barrier" only. That seemed close enough, so I added the word. $\endgroup$ – 1848 Jan 11 at 4:33

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