23
$\begingroup$

$x=a+b+c^{1}+d^{2}+ \large e ^{\normalsize67}+ \large f \large^{\normalsize62}+ \large g^{\normalsize27}+ \large h^{\normalsize14}+\small i \normalsize^5+\small j \normalsize^1+\small k \normalsize^2+\small l \normalsize^1+\small m \normalsize^1$

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Is this an anagram? $\endgroup$ – ABcDexter Nov 26 '18 at 12:21
  • $\begingroup$ It certainly looks like it might be, though in that case the combination of additive notation (+) and multiplicative notation (exponents) makes me twitch. $\endgroup$ – Gareth McCaughan Nov 26 '18 at 12:57
  • 6
    $\begingroup$ @Chowzen Would you like to comment on the fact that $a$ and $b$ have no exponents while e.g. $c$ has an explicit exponent 1? (I appreciate that the answer may be that you would not like to comment.) $\endgroup$ – Gareth McCaughan Nov 26 '18 at 12:57
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @GarethMcCaughan It should become evident when the significance of the exponents is determined. Maybe I should add the enigmatic tag to this, huh? $\endgroup$ – Chowzen Nov 26 '18 at 13:25
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Is the capital "S" in Solve (in the title) significant to finding the answer? $\endgroup$ – SolveLikeBeaker Nov 26 '18 at 18:43
24
$\begingroup$

The powers in the equation are the number of the moons (natural satellites) of the planets in the Solar System
Mercury = 0
Venus = 0
Earth = 1
Mars = 2
Following are the 'giants' which explains the bigger font:
Jupiter = 67
Saturn = 62
Uranus = 27
Neptune = 14
And the dwarf planets:
Pluto = 5
Eris = 1
Haumea = 2
Orcus = 1
Quaoar = 1

X = Solar System (or maybe the Sun)

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  • 3
    $\begingroup$ wait, rot13(jung unccrarq gb prerf)! :-) $\endgroup$ – deep thought Nov 28 '18 at 4:27
  • $\begingroup$ @deep-thought I was just thinking the same thing -- not to mention rot13(Znxrznxr) $\endgroup$ – Admiral Jota Nov 28 '18 at 15:12
  • $\begingroup$ @AdmiralJota Well, I've probably used the same planet list as Chowzen. I still can't get over the fact that what I learned in school is no longer true. $\endgroup$ – rhsquared Nov 28 '18 at 15:14
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ I knew that these numbers would cause unrest. :) Depending on the source, the number of variables (and exponents) can differ quite a bit. $\endgroup$ – Chowzen Nov 28 '18 at 15:23

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