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There's a few examples out there of websites which show you a clue / hint, and if you guess the correct password you get to the next level.

Some e.g.:

Is there a quick way to create such custom websites?

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closed as too broad by Rand al'Thor, Shahriar Mahmud Sajid, Chowzen, Glorfindel, SteveV Nov 10 '18 at 15:04

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ I'm not sure this is a question about puzzles - it seems more of a question about website-building. (I wouldn't ask how to make, say, a cooking blog on Seasoned Advice.) $\endgroup$ – Deusovi Nov 10 '18 at 8:23
  • $\begingroup$ I partly agree and partly disagree wtih @Deusovi. I think it is valid to ask on this forum if there are some "quick and easy" tools others have used for exactly this purpose, but the question is bordering off-topic for sure. $\endgroup$ – BmyGuest Nov 10 '18 at 10:52
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If you have full controll over your webpage and it is a simple "HTML only" webspace for you, the easiest way is to have each puzzle end with a "keyword" or "key-number" which is not too short, and to have the user enter that "key" to the webdomain.

Example:

You create a puzzle that results in the key YHU124MEMAMO. This puzzle page is hosted on the webserver under a link like

www.mydomain.puzzle.org/startpage.htm

and the "next" page you want people to visit after solving is stored with the name

www.mydomain.puzzle.org/YHU124MEMAMO.htm

This is of course not very elegant, but it is quick and easy to do and does not require any specific HTML knowledge.

This type of "hide-away the next step" has also been frequently used by puzzles on this site here. I used this technique myself in some of my puzzles like in "A pirate's treasure-hunt". Here, the build-up is slighlty different, because you don't controll the URL directly. I've uploaded images first - which auto-generates a link with some arbitrary "key" - and then I've build the puzzle so that this link becomes the solution.

Alternatively, you might also consider using any of the URL abbreviation services out there like Bitly. The idea here being that the "result" of your puzzle gives you a shortened URL which you can link to any webpage location you like. Thus, you don't need control over the exact URL you puzzle pages are on, which can be helpful when you're using any semi-automated web-creation tool or content-managment-system.

This is just a short answer. But as pointed out by Deusovi, going any deeper is rather a quation on "how to implement stuff on the web" than puzzle-related and should possibly be asked elsewhere.

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    $\begingroup$ Notpron is a great example of a puzzle site where a lot of the solutions involve simply changing the page URLs. $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Nov 10 '18 at 11:10

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