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Find the rule that is all correct on the left side, but not on the right side. If you don't know about bongard problems you can click here.

bongard4

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1 Answer 1

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The ones on the left

Have an odd number of circles completely contained inside of other circles. Clockwise from top left: 1,1,3,5,5,3.

The ones on the right

Have an even number of circles completely contained inside of other circles. Clockwise from top left: 0,2,2,2,2,2.

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  • $\begingroup$ Good spot, but there is a confusion on the right side, bottom right, the only diagram where gur pbagnvarq pvepyrf vagrefrpg. $\endgroup$ Oct 7, 2018 at 19:11
  • $\begingroup$ There’s no confusion there — on the right side, exactly two circles are completely contained inside the larger circle. The intersection is not a circle itself, and a circle intersecting with another is not fully contained inside the other circle. $\endgroup$
    – El-Guest
    Oct 7, 2018 at 20:51
  • $\begingroup$ I am talking about bottom right. Which are you replying about? $\endgroup$ Oct 7, 2018 at 20:54
  • $\begingroup$ The bottom right corner of the right side. How many circles would you count as fully contained? @WeatherVane $\endgroup$
    – El-Guest
    Oct 7, 2018 at 20:56
  • $\begingroup$ The same but I don't get your comment about that area: "a circle intersecting with another is not fully contained inside the other circle". They are both fully contained. My point is that they intersect, unlike any other contained circle. $\endgroup$ Oct 7, 2018 at 20:58

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