6
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Okay, so I write a lot of Riley and story riddles; however, I've noticed that I like the mathematical riddles too! I decided to write one, and I hope you all enjoy it. A few rules:

  • No rotation.
  • No duplication.
  • No combination.
  • No rounding.
  • No computers.

Good luck to all of you!


You are given the following set of numbers: $1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6$. Inject these numbers into the following equation to create a true statement.

$$\frac{a - b + c / de} {6} = \frac{6}{f}$$

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  • $\begingroup$ If you want, you can write $\cdot$ or $\times$ to respectively generate $\cdot$ or $\times$ for multiplication :) $\endgroup$ – Mr Pie Sep 22 '18 at 2:07
  • $\begingroup$ Does $c/de$ mean (1) $c/(d\cdot e)$, (2) $(c/d)\cdot e$, or (3) $c$ divided by the two-digit number given by $de$? $\endgroup$ – celtschk Sep 22 '18 at 15:34
  • $\begingroup$ Multiply d by e $\endgroup$ – Candleshark Sep 22 '18 at 23:38
5
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I think it's:

$(6-4+5/1*2)/6)$ = $(6/3)$

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  • $\begingroup$ wow 3 answers at basically the same time $\endgroup$ – Excited Raichu Sep 21 '18 at 17:52
7
+50
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$\frac{6 - 4 + 5 / 1 * 2} {6} = \frac{6}{3}$

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6
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$\frac{1 - 2 + 6/3*5}{6} = \frac{6}{4} = \frac{3}{2} = 1.5$

So

$a=1, b=2, c=6, d=3, e=5, f=4$

Edit: The rules say no computers and I didn't use a computer to get the first answer but I did use one to get these other answers:

$\frac{1 - 2 + 5/3*6}{6} = \frac{6}{4}, \frac{1 - 4 + 5/2*6}{6} = \frac{6}{3}, \frac{1 - 4 + 6/2*5}{6} = \frac{6}{3}, \frac{3 - 5 + 2/1*4}{6} = \frac{6}{6}, \frac{3 - 5 + 4/1*2}{6} = \frac{6}{6}, \frac{6 - 4 + 2/1*5}{6} = \frac{6}{3}, \frac{6 - 4 + 5/1*2}{6} = \frac{6}{3}$

These are all the solutions I believe.

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