3
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A carnie who is an extreme fan of mathematics was asked a strange question by a university student. The student asked how many rides were there total in this amusement park.

The carnie, being polite, said this.

"This number you are seeking reflects the main emotion you feel when riding these rides, especially if you love these rides. A prim graph of bad luck has this number of edges. Whether that is good or bad depends on you. I repeat the common base twice as a quaternary. A Norwegian man's theorem will show this numeral if you add the same luck described earlier. That is how many rides are here."

So, can you crack this Holmes-worthy mathematical code? How many rides are here?

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ The answer is $\pi$. It's always $\pi$... xD $\endgroup$ – Feeds Sep 1 '18 at 3:21
  • $\begingroup$ I think u may have asked the wrong person :D $\endgroup$ – Kevin L Sep 1 '18 at 3:22
  • $\begingroup$ Lol, but it is not pi $\endgroup$ – Xavier Stanton Sep 1 '18 at 4:34
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Is the answer to this

68 rides?

This number you are seeking reflects the main emotion you feel when riding these rides, especially if you love these rides.

In numerology, 68 represents a harmonious expression of personal freedom. Sounds like the main emotion one would feel on a roller coaster.

A prim graph of bad luck has this number of edges. Whether that is good or bad depends on you.

Whether the number 69 is good or bad depends on what you think of its connotations (no link provided here). At any rate, a tree with 69 vertices will have 68 edges. It could also be possible that a prim graph of size 13 has 68 edges?

I repeat the common base twice as a quaternary.

For the common base 10, we know that $68_{10} = 1010_{4}$, ie. as a quaternary, 68 is represented as 1010, the common base twice.

A Norwegian man's theorem will show this numeral if you add the same luck described earlier.

Maybe this is Abel's Theorem, which could have a -1 in some statement of it, then adding 69 yields 68...?

The quaternary clue is how I tried to piece things together, but I'm not certain if this is correct.

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  • $\begingroup$ Yes, amazing job $\endgroup$ – Xavier Stanton Sep 7 '18 at 4:56
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This number you are seeking reflects the main emotion you feel when riding these rides, especially if you love these rides.

9: on cloud nine if you're happy and enjoying

A prim graph of bad luck has this number of edges. Whether that is good or bad depends on you.

13?

I repeat the common base twice as a quaternary.

2*4 =8? Or is it... 1/8?

A Norwegian man's theorem will show this numeral if you add the same luck described earlier.

1.9 = ~2, Brunn's theorem? (Also 13 is prime)

That is how many rides are here.

9 + 13 + 8 + 2 = 32

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  • $\begingroup$ Sorry, this is incorrect. Each clue refers to the same number. $\endgroup$ – Xavier Stanton Sep 1 '18 at 17:35

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