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Will wrote I'm worn out,
and I'm not worn out, [1]
Like to a thirsty bed,
Worn, worn out of bed,
Worn to repair a bed.

[1] First word of riddle also famously wrote I'm not worn out - OP apology for any confusion.

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  • $\begingroup$ No riddle tag? Maybe enigmatic-puzzle? $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Aug 31 '18 at 20:55
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    $\begingroup$ It's a riddle, but since this doesn't start with Wo I wobbled. $\endgroup$ – Tom Aug 31 '18 at 20:56
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I think the answer to this riddle might be:

COAT

Will wrote I'm worn out,

A coat is 'worn out' in the sense that it is usually put on ('worn') when you are outside ('out'). (I tried to search for a Shakespeare quote to reinforce this line - since Will wrote - but I couldn't find one that matched suitably...)

Like to a thirsty bed,

A 'thirsty bed' might be a flower bed in need of watering. Many gardeners might have a coat specifically for use in the garden and while doing other 'dirty' jobs.

Worn, worn out of bed,

Similar reasoning to the first line - you don't wear a coat in bed, it's a garment for outdoors...

Worn to repair a bed.

This line is a cryptic-esque clue. 'A bed' can also be 'A COT'. Anagram this ('repair' it) and you get the word 'COAT'.

As for the title:

A coat is worn while out and about (e.g. going shopping, going for a hike, etc - especially on a rainy day).

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  • $\begingroup$ The technique used for the last line is correct and also applies to the previous line. The 3rd last line also has the right type of bed - which needs the answer. $\endgroup$ – Tom Sep 17 at 9:03
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the bounty @Tom :) Hopefully this has kickstarted your question towards a solution - I'll give your tips above some thought and see if I can suss it msyelf! $\endgroup$ – Stiv Sep 17 at 10:44
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A Rose

Will said I'm worn out

"Tell him he wears the rose of youth upon him"

But I'm not worn out

"A rose by any other name would smell as sweet" i.e., it has lost nothing

Like to a thirsty bed,

A Flower bed is a thirsty bed

Worn, worn out of bed,

Because it "arose" in the morning? ;) I'm not sure. If you add worn to bed as an anagram, you get browned. I strongly suspect this is irrelevant.

Worn to repair a bed.

As an apology in a relationship?

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  • $\begingroup$ A sweet answer which has a connection with the sought for word. $\endgroup$ – Tom Sep 17 at 8:58

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