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Just another homophone riddle

You can see me at a party or on the ground
Whichever one, it makes the same sound
If you find me on the ground you can pick me up
If you find me at a party, you probably can't

What are the homophones?

Hint:

The one on the ground is very common

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ It is litter, though not balloons, rocks, or bases $\endgroup$ – Duck Aug 29 '18 at 2:00
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    $\begingroup$ I'm probably making homophone riddle 3 tomorrow, but I might do my own version of the name that name series. $\endgroup$ – Duck Aug 29 '18 at 5:11
  • $\begingroup$ Compliments to Xavier Stanton $\endgroup$ – Duck Aug 29 '18 at 5:23
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    $\begingroup$ Ok, I will see which homophone hmmm... $\endgroup$ – Duck Aug 29 '18 at 21:51
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    $\begingroup$ Ok, I think I've got em'. $\endgroup$ – Duck Aug 29 '18 at 21:53
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Is it

rapper and wrapper

Because

Parties can have rappers while you can find wrappers on the ground. Also, you can pick up the wrapper from the ground but not the rapper from the party. Not sure exactly about the second clue though. Maybe because they can both make sounds?

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  • $\begingroup$ I could see this being the answer. $\endgroup$ – PerpetualJ Aug 29 '18 at 2:26
  • $\begingroup$ And it is! Sorry I wasn't there 2 hours ago $\endgroup$ – Duck Aug 29 '18 at 5:00
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    $\begingroup$ Ohh, the second line was just restating that they were homophones, and it originally going to be a rhyming one, and it wouldn't say anywhere else that it was a homophone riddle but then I changed it $\endgroup$ – Duck Aug 29 '18 at 5:02
  • $\begingroup$ Oh so it just restates that they're homophones. Now the line makes sense to me. $\endgroup$ – sedrick Aug 29 '18 at 5:47
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Probably wrong, but:

BALLOON?

You can see me at a party or on the ground

Balloons are often seen at birthday parties, but might also be lying around on the ground.

Whichever one, it makes the same sound

BANG when you pop it.

If you find me on the ground you can pick me up

Clearly.

If you find me at a party, you probably can't

At a party they might be floating in the air, so you can't pick them up.

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  • $\begingroup$ Sorry, good try though. The party is more of a public dancing sorta type party, not a birthday one $\endgroup$ – Duck Aug 28 '18 at 23:56
  • $\begingroup$ @Duck Another possibility would be to take the last three letters off this answer. A disco **** you can't lift, but a **** on the ground you can. $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Aug 28 '18 at 23:57
  • $\begingroup$ No, it is not that either, but you are closer than balloon $\endgroup$ – Duck Aug 28 '18 at 23:58
  • $\begingroup$ @Duck Closer in what way? :-P Similar word? Right kind of party? $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Aug 28 '18 at 23:59
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Are you

Base and Bass

You can see me at a party or on the ground

Music Base, and the base of somehing.

Whichever one, it makes the same sound

Base and bass sound the same.

If you find me on the ground you can pick me up

It is placed on the ground to hold stuff.

If you find me at a party, you probably can't

You can't hold music like 1848 said.

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  • $\begingroup$ As I said earlier it's more of a person's job $\endgroup$ – Duck Aug 29 '18 at 1:53
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Could you be

FLOUR and FLOWER?

You can see me at a party or on the ground

At a birthday party, there is always cake, which has flour.
On the ground, flowers can grow.

Whichever one, it makes the same sound

That defines what a homophone is.

If you find me on the ground you can pick me up
If you find me at a party, you probably can't

True for the first part.
True for the second part, but not technically. Slices of cake containing flour can be picked up with a utensil (you yourself can't probably pick up the flour!), but obviously, the purpose of the action is to not actually pick it up; it is to eat the cake!

Also,

Flour and flowers are not balloons, rocks or bases... but they are not really litter, either. I guess a flower could be litter, as the archaic definition of litter is the choice of bedding for a horse (that of which can include plants).

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  • $\begingroup$ I like the answer ;) +1 $\endgroup$ – Duck Aug 29 '18 at 14:16
  • $\begingroup$ @Duck thank you! I like the riddle ;) ... though unfortunately I have reached my daily voting limit, and I have to wait $9$ hours before I can vote again (DVL9). $\endgroup$ – Feeds Aug 29 '18 at 14:18
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Rock (stone) and rock (music)

because

When you drop a rock, it makes a 'clank' sound. When you play rock music, it also makes 'harsh' sounds. They show up on the ground and at parties respectively.

Also,

You can pick up stones, but I have yet to see a person pick up rock music sound waves.

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  • $\begingroup$ So close! It's more of a person though $\endgroup$ – Duck Aug 29 '18 at 1:10
  • $\begingroup$ Those are also homonyms, not homophones. $\endgroup$ – PerpetualJ Aug 29 '18 at 1:55
  • $\begingroup$ Yeah, you're right @PerpetualJ $\endgroup$ – Duck Aug 29 '18 at 1:57
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This could be;

Chord and Cord

Found both at a party and on the ground:

Chords are used in music to carry the tune. Cords have many uses but are often running along the ground in some manner.

Found on the ground you can pick it up;

You can certainly pick cords up off the ground.

At a party you can’t;

At a typical party you can’t raise the chords of a song (unless you’re a live band).

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  • $\begingroup$ No, chords aren't a full time job, really $\endgroup$ – Duck Aug 29 '18 at 2:02
  • $\begingroup$ Think about it this way, who is the one making the chords or rock music or whatever $\endgroup$ – Duck Aug 29 '18 at 2:04
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New answer, will update;

Band and Banned

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  • $\begingroup$ I see you mean you can find like a rubber band on the ground or a hair band, but the line about parties isn't so clear so focus on the hint more $\endgroup$ – Duck Aug 29 '18 at 2:09
  • $\begingroup$ And the unclear line is more of a solo, kinda like a DJ at parties but a bit different $\endgroup$ – Duck Aug 29 '18 at 2:11

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