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This question already has an answer here:

An old school boy riddle is how to to have 5 x "and" in sequence and yet still make grammatical sense. The answer is that a man saw a sign advertising Dogs and Cats for sale. He commented that the sign was badly laid out because there was too much space between Dogs and "and" and "and" and Cats. = 5 x "and" QUESTION: Can you make grammatically correct sequence with more than 5 x the same word (not necessarily "and") ? If so, what is the maximum number of times of that word in sequence? NOTE: By "sequence" I do not mean a single sentence. The "sequence" can be any number of consecutive sentences (and/or phrases) which themselves may include as many punctuation and quotation marks as you like as long as the whole "sequence" is correct grammatically.

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marked as duplicate by Bass, JMP, Saeïdryl, rhsquared, A J Aug 27 '18 at 10:50

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • $\begingroup$ By the looks of it, the sentence is grammatically incorrect, at least for me. The 5 ands in question isn't correct. The original sign was "Dogs and Cats for sale" , and the man said "....Dogs and "and" and "and" and Cats" thereby inserting an extra "and" in the original sentence. It should have been "...Dogs and "and" and Cats". The sentence the man was referring to would be "....Dogs and and Cats for sale" which isn't what you mentioned earlier. $\endgroup$ – R.D Aug 27 '18 at 8:08
  • $\begingroup$ But welcome to Puzzling! $\endgroup$ – R.D Aug 27 '18 at 8:09
  • $\begingroup$ Hi, Welcome to Puzzling Stack Exchange (PSE). Please Clarify Your Question, Because I may be dumb at times :P $\endgroup$ – Holyprogrammer Aug 27 '18 at 8:09
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    $\begingroup$ @R.D I disagree, the man is saying that there is too much space between Dogs and the word and, and between the word and and Cats. Or Dogs and and and and and Cats. $\endgroup$ – Keelhaul Aug 27 '18 at 8:20
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    $\begingroup$ @Keelhaul makes sense! That comma makes all the difference. Without it, it seemed a bit messy. $\endgroup$ – R.D Aug 27 '18 at 8:27
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You can add the word

Buffalo

an arbitrary number of times and it's always grammatically correct.

Because

Buffalo can be a modifier (something from Buffalo, NY), a noun (the animal) or a verb (to intimidate)

e.g.

Buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo

or, animals from Buffalo, NY intimidate other animals from the same city.

See

Wikipedia

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  • $\begingroup$ Please Explain What You Mean? $\endgroup$ – Holyprogrammer Aug 27 '18 at 8:08
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I quite like the one about the two guys comparing their grammar exam answers:

John, while Pete had had "had", had had "had had".

Or to take it to ridiculousness: wikipedia

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  • $\begingroup$ Yes . Thanks ! Using "had" in that way is what I had (no pun intended ! ) as the best answer. The "had / had had" series can be continued almost forever (but I didn't realize that even THAT is now on Wikipedia ) . $\endgroup$ – Peter Bentley Aug 27 '18 at 9:25
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I'd say you can come up with infinitely long series of "and" if you wish so:

For instance, in your example with 5 "and", I find there is too much space between "Dogs" and "and" and "and" and ""and"" and ""and"" and "and" and "and" and ""and"" and ""and"" and "and" and "and" and Cats.
So, here I made 21 "and", but one more iteration and you could come up with 85. The exact formula seems to be 4n + 1 "and" with n the number of "and" in the previous iteration.

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    $\begingroup$ So what you're saying is that you can make a grammatical sentence with both "and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and and" and "and and and and... $\endgroup$ – jafe Aug 27 '18 at 8:58
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You need a word with different meanings. It could for example be a name;

You can use the word/name Will. You can say for example: Will Will tell his friend Willy, that he will visit his cousin William or will he just go.

You can also use the same name for all characters but thats really confusing.

You can say for example: Will Will tell his friend Will, that he will visit his cousin Will or will he just go.

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to puzzling.SE! I believe the question is about the longest continuous sequence of the same word. $\endgroup$ – xhienne Aug 27 '18 at 9:47

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