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You find some graffiti. It reads: "The pouch lives in the 3x4 inverted moniker." It appears to be signed by "OyouOrtut␣␣␣" And there is also "ariibeaobvtn abbrev." What does this mean?

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The answer:

Draw a grid, three across, 4 down (3x4). Abbrev. is self-referential. If you wrote "abbreviation" like this:  you can read it as "ariibeaobvtn". Now write the signature (moniker), in the same way as "abbreviation". It should look like this: enter image description here. If you read it as the gibberish version of "abbreviation", it becomes "out you Ort ". Ort is German for "place". Translate the English to German, and vise versa (inverted). This gives "aus Sie place". "aus Sie" → "ausSie" → "Aussie". This thus means "Aussie place", or Australia. Kangaroos have pouches, and live in Australia. Thus, this OyouOrtut␣␣␣ guy is saying "Kangaroos live in Australia"!

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  • $\begingroup$ You really should have added the language tag to this riddle, but well done. $\endgroup$ – Joe-You-Know Aug 1 '18 at 15:26
  • $\begingroup$ I sure made a cool puzzle! I was at the cafe, and thought of "aus" and "sie". I made that into a puzzle later, before going to the harbor. $\endgroup$ – Ikura Aug 1 '18 at 16:30
  • $\begingroup$ I got as far as "Out_yOu_ort_" but I never would have thought to translate to/from German. Also, doesn't the big "O" end up in the wrong place? $\endgroup$ – EightAndAHalfTails Aug 2 '18 at 15:53
  • $\begingroup$ You should neglect caps. $\endgroup$ – Ikura Aug 2 '18 at 16:09
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I'm pretty sure this is

Jeroo, the programming language.

The pouch lives in the 3x4 inverted moniker.

In Jeroo, you program a Kangaroo to move around a grid (like a 3x4 grid). Pouch here refers to a Kangaroo. I'm not entirely sure what the meaning is behind the name though.

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    $\begingroup$ The pouch is that animal, but really, it's a factual statement involving rearrangement of letters. $\endgroup$ – Ikura Jul 30 '18 at 21:15

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